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Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area

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Title: Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area, Dewey Lake State Forest, Fishtrap Lake State Park, Kentucky Ridge State Forest, Kentenia State Forest
Collection: National Park Service National Recreation Areas, Protected Areas Established in 1974, Protected Areas of Fentress County, Tennessee, Protected Areas of McCreary County, Kentucky, Protected Areas of Morgan County, Tennessee, Protected Areas of Pickett County, Tennessee, Protected Areas of Scott County, Tennessee, United States National Park Service Areas in Kentucky, United States National Park Service Areas in Tennessee
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area

Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area
IUCN category V (protected landscape/seascape)
Map showing the location of Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area
Map showing the location of Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area
Location Tennessee & Kentucky, USA
Nearest city Oneida, Tennessee, and Whitley City, Kentucky
Coordinates
Area 125,310 acres (50,710 ha)[1]
Established March 7, 1974
Visitors 600,161 (in 2012)[2]
Governing body National Park Service

The Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area preserves the Big South Fork of the Cumberland River and its tributaries in northeastern Tennessee and southeastern Kentucky. In addition, the former mining community of Blue Heron is preserved and interpreted via signage.

The Big South Fork region contains one of the highest concentrations of McCreary County in Kentucky. Charit Creek Lodge is a wilderness lodge, accessible by trail, located within the park.[3]

Contents

  • Geology 1
  • Sources 2
  • Gallery 3
  • External links 4

Geology

The Big South Fork’s most prominent feature is the river gorge cutting through the softer Mississippian age rock beneath the hard Pennsylvanian capstone of the natural arches and unusual hoodoos.[4]

Due to the substantial amount of annual rainfall of the region and the action of the Hoodoos are a rare but intriguing feature occurring in the Big South Fork. These hoodoos form in a similar manner to those found in the western United States. Where tough capstone still exists on the side of a hill for instance, it prevents the erosion of the softer material below. The result is a naturally formed erect columnar rock where once was located a hill.[5]

Sources

  1. ^ "Listing of acreage as of December 31, 2011". Land Resource Division, National Park Service. Retrieved 2012-12-16. 
  2. ^ "NPS Annual Recreation Visits Report". National Park Service. Retrieved 2013-12-23. 
  3. ^ http://www.charitcreeklodge.com/
  4. ^ Russ Manning. (1994). "Exploring the Big South Fork." Norris: Mountain Laural Place.
  5. ^ Russ Manning. (1999). "The Historic Cumberland Plateau." Knoxville: The University of Tennessee Press.

Gallery

External links

  • "Big South Fork NPS Site". National Park Service. Retrieved 2011-08-08. 
  • "Big South Fork Landforms". Tom Dunigan. Retrieved 2011-08-08. 
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