World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Bite indicator

Article Id: WHEBN0012764618
Reproduction Date:

Title: Bite indicator  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Fishing float, Carolina rig, Basnig, Jug fishing, Shrimp baiting
Collection: Fishing Equipment
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Bite indicator

A bite indicator is a mechanical or electronic device which indicates to an angler that something is happening at the hook end of the fishing line.

Types

There are many types of bite indicators. Which ones work best depends on the type of fishing.

  • Fishing floats: widely used as bite indicators.
  • Quiver tips: attached onto the end of the fishing rod.
  • Bite alarms: electronic devices which bleep when a fish tugs a fishing line. The fishing line is wound on a running roller which makes a noise when the fishing line moves, thus alerting the angler that a fish might be hooked.[1] They are attached to the fishing rod between the reel and the first eye on the rod, and give an audibly alert when there is a simple movement of the line. Bite alarms can range from simple devices with an on/off switch that do no more than indicate when the line moves over the roller, to more complicated devices with volume, tone and sensitivity controls. They are useful when fishing with more than one rod, and are commonly used when coarse fishing for carp. Whereas floats can be used as visual bite detectors, bite alarms are audible bite detectors. Although more expensive than visual devices, audible devices are popular as they do not require constant monitoring. They were invented by Richard Walker.

Notes

  1. ^ Bite indicators

External links

  • Fishing Bite Alarms
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.