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Bob Smith (doctor)

Bob Smith
Bob Smith
Bob Smith, Alcoholics Anonymous
Born Robert Holbrook Smith
(1879-08-08)August 8, 1879
St. Johnsbury, Vermont
Died November 16, 1950(1950-11-16) (aged 71)
Known for co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous
Spouse(s) Anne Smith (m. 1915)

Robert Holbrook Smith (August 8, 1879 – November 16, 1950), also known as Dr. Bob, was an American physician and surgeon who co-founded Alcoholics Anonymous with Bill Wilson, more commonly known as Bill W.

Contents

  • Family and early life 1
  • Education, marriage, work, and alcoholism 2
  • Meeting Bill Wilson 3
  • Final years 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • Further reading 7
  • External links 8

Family and early life

He was born in St. Johnsbury, Vermont, where he was raised, to Susan A. Holbrook and Walter Perrin Smith.[1] His parents took him to religious services four times a week, and in response he determined he would never attend religious services when he grew up.

Education, marriage, work, and alcoholism

He began drinking at university, attending Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. Early on he noticed that he could recover from drinking bouts quicker and easier than his classmates and that he never had headaches, which caused him to believe he was an alcoholic from the time he began drinking. Smith was a member of Kappa Kappa Kappa fraternity at Dartmouth. After graduation in 1902, he worked for three years selling hardware in Boston, Chicago, and Montreal and continued drinking heavily. He then returned to school to study medicine. By this time drinking had begun to affect him to the point where he began missing classes. His drinking caused him to leave school, but he returned and passed his examinations for his sophomore year. He transferred to Rush Medical College, but his alcoholism worsened to the point that his father was summoned to try to halt his downward trajectory. But his drinking increased and after a dismal showing during final examinations, the university required that he remain for two extra quarters and remain sober during that time as a condition of graduating.

Smith's house in Akron

After graduation Smith became a hospital intern, and for two years he was able to stay busy enough to refrain from heavy drinking. He married Anne Robinson Ripley on January 25, 1915, and opened up his own office in Akron, Ohio, specializing in colorectal surgery and returned to heavy drinking. Recognizing his problem, he checked himself into more than a dozen hospitals and sanitariums in an effort to stop his drinking. He was encouraged by the passage of Prohibition in 1919, but soon discovered that the exemption for medicinal alcohol and bootleggers could supply more than enough to continue his excessive drinking. For the next 17 years his life revolved around how to subvert his wife’s efforts to stop his drinking and obtain the alcohol he craved while trying to hold together a medical practice in order to support his family and his drinking.

Meeting Bill Wilson

In January 1933, Anne Smith attended a lecture by Frank Buchman, the founder of the Oxford Group. For the next two years she and Dr. Smith attended local meetings of the group in an effort to solve his alcoholism, but recovery eluded him until he met Bill Wilson on May 13, 1935. Wilson, an alcoholic who had learned how to stay sober by helping other alcoholics through the Oxford Group in New York, was in Akron on business that had proven unsuccessful and he was in fear of relapsing. Recognizing the danger, he made inquiries about any local alcoholics he could talk to and was referred to Smith by Henrietta Sieberling, one of the leaders of the Akron Oxford Group. After talking to Wilson, Smith stopped drinking and invited Wilson to stay at his home. He relapsed almost a month later while attending a professional convention in Atlantic City. Returning to Akron on June 9, he was given a few drinks by Wilson to avoid delirium tremens. He drank one beer the next morning to settle his nerves so he could perform an operation, which proved to be the last drink he would ever take. The date, June 10, 1935, is celebrated as the anniversary of the founding of Alcoholics Anonymous.

Final years

Smith was called the "Prince of Twelfth Steppers" by Wilson because he helped more than 5000 alcoholics before his death. He was able to stay sober from June 10, 1935, until his death in 1950 from colon cancer.

See also

References

  1. ^ """Ancestry of "Dr. Bob S.. Wargs.com. 1950-11-16. Retrieved 2013-03-14. 
  • "Dr. Bob's Nightmare". Alcoholics Anonymous: the story of how many thousands of men and women have recovered from alcoholism (PDF) (4th ed.). New York, New York: Alcoholics Anonymous World Services. 2002.  
  • "Anne Ripley Smith". Recovery Universe. Retrieved 14 February 2012. 

Further reading

  • Alcoholics Anonymous. Dr. Bob and the Good Oldtimers: a Biography, with Recollections of Early A.A. in the Midwest. New York: Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, 1980. N.B.: No identification of individual author(s) or editor(s) of the text is made. ISBN 0-916856-07-0

External links

  • "Dr Bob's Home" website, Akron, Ohio
  • Works by or about Bob Smith in libraries (WorldCat catalog)
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