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Boomer's Story

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Title: Boomer's Story  
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Subject: 1972 in music, Ry Cooder, Jamming with Edward!, New Lost City Ramblers, Battle Cry of Freedom, Sleepy John Estes, Maria Elena, Paradise and Lunch, Into the Purple Valley
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Boomer's Story

Boomer's Story
Ry Cooder
Released November 1972
Recorded Amigo Studios, Burbank
Genre Roots rock, blues, folk, Americana
Length 39:07
Label Reprise
Producer Jim Dickinson, Lenny Waronker
Ry Cooder chronology

Into the Purple Valley
(1972)
Boomer's Story
(1972)
Paradise and Lunch
(1974)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4/5 stars link
Robert Christgau (B) link
Piero Scaruffi (5.5/10)[1]

Boomer's Story is an album by American roots rock musician Ry Cooder, released in 1972.

Track listing

Side one

  1. "Boomer's Story" (listed as "Traditional," actually Carson Robison) – 4:13
  2. "Cherry Ball Blues" (Skip James) – 4:10
  3. "Crow Black Chicken" (Lawrence Wilson) – 2:14
  4. "Ax Sweet Mama" (Sleepy John Estes) – 4:23
  5. "Maria Elena" (Bob Russell, Lorenzo Barcelata) – 4:30

Side two

  1. "The Dark End of the Street" (Dan Penn, Chips Moman) – 3:25
  2. "Rally 'Round the Flag" (George F. Root) – 3:34
  3. "Comin' in on a Wing and a Prayer" (Jimmy McHugh, Harold Adamson) – 3:00
  4. "President Kennedy" (Sleepy John Estes) – 4:39
  5. "Good Morning Mr. Railroad Man" (Traditional) – 4:30

About

The title track was previously recorded as "The Railroad Boomer"[2] by Bud Billings (aka Frank Luther) and Carson Robison in a performance recorded at the studio at Liederkranz Hall in New York on September 9, 1929 (Victor V-40139).[3][4] Although it is credited on Cooder's album as "traditional," Robison was awarded a copyright and the song "can't be shown to have circulated in oral tradition."[5] Gene Autry recorded it in December of the same year.[6] In the 1930s the song was recorded for Decca Records by the Rice Brothers' Gang,[7][8] in 1939 by Roy Acuff & His Smoky Mountain Boys, in 1941 by Riley Puckett for RCA, and in the 1950s by Cisco Houston (as "The Rambler") and by The New Lost City Ramblers, who included Cooder's guitar teacher, Tom Paley.

Personnel

Notes

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