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Brad Nessler

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Brad Nessler

Brad Nessler
Born (1956-06-03) June 3, 1956
St. Charles, Minnesota, USA
Education Minnesota State University
Occupation Sportscaster

Bradley "Brad" Nessler (born June 3, 1956) is an American sportscaster, who currently calls college basketball and college football games for ESPN with occasional appearances on ABC. He has also called Thursday Night Football on NFL Network from 2011 to 2013, and appears annually as a commentator in EA Sports' NCAA Football. Also, his voice (and that of his broadcast partner, Dick Vitale) was featured in EA Sports' NCAA March Madness video game series.

Career

Early assignments

Nessler began his professional broadcasting career sharing Atlanta Falcons from 1982 to 1988 on WGST and WSB-AM before assuming the same position for the Minnesota Vikings during the 1988 and 1989 seasons. He also called preseason telecasts for the Miami Dolphins for several years, and has done play-by-play of ACC football and basketball telecasts for Jefferson-Pilot.

CBS Sports

In 1990 and 1991, Nessler worked for CBS Sports, calling NFL games, college football, and college basketball (both men's and women's college basketball).[1]

ESPN and ABC Sports

Nessler's career with ESPN began in 1992 and expanded with the addition of ABC Sports assignments in 1997.

From 2002–04, Nessler was a broadcaster for the NBA,[2] including calling the 2003 NBA Finals. During this particular period, Nessler was accused (among them, the New York Times '​ Richard Sandomir) of not knowing game strategy well, lacking rhythm and enthusiasm in his game call, not bringing out the best in his partners (i.e. Bill Walton and Tom Tolbert), too often ignoring the score, and tending to stammer.

When Nessler began calling college football for ABC in 1997 he was regarded as the #3 play-by-play man behind Keith Jackson and Brent Musburger. He was promoted to #2 upon Jackson's scaling back to West Coast games in 1999, and was the #1 Saturday afternoon play-by-play man from 2006 until the 2008 season. In July 2009, ESPN announced that Nessler would move to the top play-by-play man for ESPN's coverage of college football, being primarily responsible for ESPN's Saturday Primetime game airing at 7:45 PM Eastern Time.

He originally worked with Gary Danielson as his college football color man when he began working for ABC in 1997, but from 1999-2008 called games alongside Bob Griese (who traded positions with Danielson). Starting in 2006, Paul Maguire joined Nessler and Griese as a third color commentator for the Saturday afternoon college telecasts. Upon the announcement of Nessler's move to ESPN's Saturday Primetime telecasts, it was also announced that he would be teamed with former Penn State quarterback Todd Blackledge and sideline reporter Erin Andrews beginning with the 2009 college football season; this crew also called the January 1, 2010 Capital One Bowl on ABC.

Since 2006, Nessler has provided play-by-play for SEC games on Super Tuesday, alongside Jimmy Dykes or Dick Vitale and sideline reporter Heather Cox. The duo also covers Saturday afternoon games for ESPN during the regular college basketball season, and previously appeared on ABC.

On September 11, 2006, ESPN began its coverage of Monday Night Football with a Week 1 doubleheader. Nessler teamed with Ron Jaworski, Dick Vermeil, and Bonnie Bernstein to call the second game, featuring the San Diego Chargers and Oakland Raiders. On September 13, 2010, Nessler again worked a Monday Night Football game, teaming with Trent Dilfer and Suzy Kolber to call the San Diego Chargers and Kansas City Chiefs in the second game of that night's Week 1 doubleheader. On September 12, 2011, Nessler and Dilfer called the Oakland Raiders and Denver Broncos in the second game of the Week 1 doubleheader; the game included a 63-yard field goal kicked by Oakland's Sebastian Janikowski, which tied an NFL record.

NFL Network

In May 2011, Nessler was hired by NFL Network to call its Thursday Night Football telecasts, on which he was teamed with analyst Mike Mayock for an eight-game package.[3] He continued to call the game package in 2012 and 2013, expanded to thirteen games, before CBS Sports took over responsibility for the package in the 2014 NFL season.

Personal

Nessler is a graduate of Minnesota State University, Mankato.

References

  1. ^ Bowl Championship Series - Nessler, Brad
  2. ^ Sports Media Watch presents the ten worst personnel moves of the 2000s. #9: Brad Nessler as lead NBA play-by-play voice (2002-03, ESPN/ABC)
  3. ^ Deitsch, Richard (2011-05-05). "Brad Nessler, Mike Mayock form new NFL Network booth". SI.com. 

External links

  • Brad Nessler's ESPN Bio
Preceded by
Marv Albert
Play-by-Play announcer, NBA Finals
2003
Succeeded by
Al Michaels
Preceded by
none
Play-by-Play announcer, Saturday Primetime
2005-2006
Succeeded by
Dan Shulman
Preceded by
Bob Papa
Thursday Night Football play-by-play commentator
2011-2013
Succeeded by
Jim Nantz
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