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Carlo Thränhardt

Carlo Thränhardt
Personal information
Born 1957

Carlo Thränhardt (born 1957-07-05 in Bad Lauchstädt, Saxony-Anhalt) is a German high jumper, who won the silver medal at the 1981 European Indoor Championships in Grenoble. He excelled at indoor competitions, setting the world indoor record on three occasions between 1984-88. His best mark of 2.42 meters makes him equal-second (with Swede Patrik Sjoberg), and has been exceeded - indoors and out – only by current world record holder Javier Sotomayor of Cuba. Like all modern high jumpers, Thränhardt used the Fosbury Flop style, but of the eleven men in history to have cleared 2.40 meters (7 ft 10 1/2in) or better, he was only the second to do so jumping off his right leg. Russian jumpers Igor Paklin – in September 1985 – and Vyacheslav Voronin – in August 2000 – are the only other jumpers in history to clear 2.40 using a right foot take-off. (See: Table listing "Top Performers" in entry for High Jump)

Career

He achieved his personal best performance in outdoor competitions with 2.37 m on 2 September 1984 in Rieti. This result is also the German outdoor record.[1]

Thränhardt was particularly well known for his prowess during the indoor track & field seasons. He set a total of three world indoor records. His first record jump was recorded on February 24, 1984, in the Schöneberger sports hall during which he achieved a mark of 2.37m. On January 16, 1987 in Simmerath, Germany he became the first man to clear 2.40 m indoors. This mark bested his countryman Dietmar Mögenburg's record of 2.39 m set in Cologne, Germany (1985).

On February 26, 1988 he set his last world indoor record of 2.42 m in the Schöneberger sports hall. By this time, the requirement for a roofless arena had recently been stricken from the world record (commonly known as "world outdoor record") rules, so this mark was also recognised as equalling Patrik Sjöberg's world record. It remained a world record until September 1988, when it was beaten by Javier Sotomayor (2.43 m), and a world indoor record until March 1989, when Sotomayor repeated this performance indoors. In 1990, roofs were again banned for world records, and Thränhardt's 2.42 m was retroactively removed from all official outdoor record and performance lists. Although roofs have once again been allowed (from 1998), this record (which would still be a European record shared with Sjöberg, as well as the German record) has not been retroactively reinstated. The second highest jump ever indoors, it remains the European indoor record.

Jumping as a masters athlete, Thränhardt set the M55 World Record at 1.87m at the Flopfest meet in Eberstadt, Germany.[2]

Carlo Thränhardt was firstly a member of ASV Köln, later moving to LG Bayer Leverkusen. He had a match weight of 86 kg and was 1.99 m tall.

In 2004 he participated in the RTL version of I'm a Celebrity, Get Me Out of Here!.

References

  1. ^ Microsoft Word - Ewige DLV-Bestenliste.doc
  2. ^ http://masterstrack.com/2012/08/23210/
  • Carlo Thränhardt profile at IAAF
Records
Preceded by
Dietmar Mögenburg
Patrik Sjöberg
Men's High Jump Indoor World Record Holder
January 16, 1987 – February 1, 1987
February 26, 1988 – March 4, 1989
Succeeded by
Patrik Sjöberg
Javier Sotomayor
Preceded by
Dietmar Mögenburg
Patrik Sjöberg
Men's High Jump European Indoor Record Holder
January 16, 1987 – February 1, 1987
February 26, 1988 –
(shared with Ivan Ukhov from February 24, 2014)
Succeeded by
Patrik Sjöberg
Incumbent
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