World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Charles Bagot

Article Id: WHEBN0000557869
Reproduction Date:

Title: Charles Bagot  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Charles Metcalfe, 1st Baron Metcalfe, Gordon Drummond, Bagot, Governors General of the Province of Canada, Richard Bagot (bishop)
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Charles Bagot

Sir Charles Bagot
GCB MA
Governor General of the Province of Canada
In office
1842–1843
Monarch Queen Victoria
Preceded by Charles Poulett Thomson, 1st Baron Sydenham
Succeeded by Charles Metcalfe, 1st Baron Metcalfe
Lieutenant Governor of Canada West
In office
1842–1843
Monarch Victoria
Preceded by Sir Richard Downes Jackson
Succeeded by Charles Metcalfe, 1st Baron Metcalfe
Lieutenant Governor of Canada East
In office
1842–1843
Monarch Victoria
Preceded by Sir Richard Downes Jackson
Succeeded by Charles Metcalfe, 1st Baron Metcalfe
Personal details
Born 23 September 1781 (1781-09-23)
Blithfield Hall, Staffordshire, England
Died 19 May 1843(1843-05-19) (aged 61)
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Nationality British
Spouse(s) Lady Mary Charlotte Anne Wellesley
Alma mater Christ Church, Oxford
Occupation politician, administrator, diplomat
Sir Charles Bagot (Francis William Wilkin, 1825)

Sir Charles Bagot GCB (23 September 1781 – 19 May 1843) was an British politician, diplomat and colonial administrator. He served as ambassador to the United States, Russia, and the Netherlands. He served as the first Governor General of the Province of Canada from 1841-1843.[1]

Contents

  • Early life, family, education, political career 1
  • Diplomatic career 2
    • Ambassador to United States 2.1
    • Ambassador to Russia, Netherlands 2.2
  • Colonial Administrator 3
    • Governor General of Canada 3.1
    • University administrator 3.2
    • Death 3.3
    • Legacy 3.4
  • Family 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Early life, family, education, political career

He was the second son of William Bagot, 1st Baron Bagot of Blithfield Hall, Staffordshire. He was educated at Rugby School and Christ Church, Oxford. He entered Lincoln’s Inn, where he studied law, but left and returned to Oxford to complete his master's degree.[2]

His marriage to the wealthy Mary Charlotte Anne Wellesley-Pole, the niece of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, and other Bagot family connections made possible his subsequent diplomatic career.

Bagot served as Member of Parliament for Castle Rising from 1807 to 1808.

Diplomatic career

Ambassador to United States

He was named minister plenipotentiary and envoy extraordinaire to the United States on 31 July 1815, in the aftermath of the War of 1812. With Richard Rush, he negotiated the Rush–Bagot Treaty to limit naval forces on the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain. He also contributed to negotiations leading to the Anglo-American Convention of 1818, which defined the border between British North America and the United States from Lake of the Woods (see Northwest Angle) to the Pacific Ocean. Bagot ended his term in Washington, D.C. in 1820.

Ambassador to Russia, Netherlands

He subsequently served as British Ambassador to Russia, where he took part in negotiations leading to the 1825 Treaty of Saint Petersburg.

Then, he served as British Ambassador to the Netherlands, where he was involved in negotiations leading to the establishment of Belgium in 1831.

Colonial Administrator

Governor General of Canada

After a hiatus of ten years from diplomatic service, Bagot agreed to succeed Lord Sydenham as governor general of the newly proclaimed Province of Canada. He was chosen because of his diplomatic knowledge of the United States. Bagot was appointed 27 September 1841, and arrived in the Canadian capital Kingston on 10 January 1842, taking office two days later. He also held, in conjunction, the posts of Lieutenant Governor of Canada East and Lieutenant Governor of Canada West for the same term.

Bagot was ordered by the British government to resist the strengthening demands for responsible government. As an important concession, however, Bagot did allow the leading Canadian colonial politicians Robert Baldwin and Sir Louis-Hippolyte Lafontaine to form a ministry, on the basis of their parliamentary majority. Lafontaine, as a French-Canadian leader, had suffered abusive treatment by the British under the previous governor general, Lord Sydenham, who had died in office in 1841. This was the beginning of what became known as representative government in Canada. Bagot's leadership was an important step forward in establishing more amicable relations between the colonizing British and French.

Bagot worked productively with Baldwin and Lafontaine to establish a structure for fair municipal governance in the province of Canada. Their work has stood the test of time. With the arrival of Confederation in 1867, a well-defined system of three-tiered governance—federal, provincial, and municipal—came into being in Ontario and Quebec.

While serving as governor-general, Bagot ordered the first criminal extradition of a fugitive slave to the United States from Canada West. The fugitive in question, Nelson Hacket (or Hackett), had been valet and butler to a wealthy Arkansas slave owner. In 1841, Hacket stole a beaver overcoat and a racing mare from his master, as well as a gold watch and a saddle from two others, and fled to Canada West. Hacket's master caught up with him in Chatham, Ontario, and Hacket was jailed. Governor-General Bagot ruled Hacket had committed a crime by stealing items not necessary for his escape, and for this reason he was extradited. The public in Canada West, as well as abolitionists in the U.S. and Canada, were dismayed, and their displeasure led to a formal treaty, which codified rules for extradition, but upset fugitives, abolitionists, and slave owners.[3]

University administrator

He served as Chancellor of King's College, (now the University of Toronto), 1842-1843.

Death

Having resigned his governor general's office in January 1843, Bagot died four months later at the vice-regal residence, Alwington House, Alwington, Kingston, too ill to return to the United Kingdom.

Legacy

Today, he is chiefly remembered for his contributions to the development of the "undefended border" between the United States and Canada, and for fostering more cooperative and positive political relations between the two main colonial groups of British and French settlers.

Bagot Street, a main thoroughfare in downtown Kingston, is named in his memory.

Family

Lady Mary Charlotte Ann Bagot from a miniature by Hoppner, R.A.

Right Hon. Sir Charles Bagot, Bart., G.C.B., married Lady Mary Charlotte Anne Wellesley, daughter of William Wellesley-Pole, 3rd Earl of Mornington on 22 July 1806. The couple had three sons and five daughters. The family accompanied their parents to Canada, on the appointment of Sir Charles Bagot as Governor-General of British North America on 12 January 1842. As the wife of a Governor-General in Canada, Lady Bagot assumed the title of 'Her Excellency' in Montreal in August 1842. After her husband's death at Kingston, Ontario on 18 May 1843, she accompanied his remains to England. She died in London on 2 February 1845.[4]

References

  1. ^ Monet, Jacques (14 January 2008). "Sir Charles Bagot".  
  2. ^ Monet, Jacques (1988). "Bagot, Sir Charles". In Halpenny, Francess G.  
  3. ^ Winks, Robin W. (1997). The Blacks in Canada: A History (second ed.). McGill-Queen's University Press. pp. 172–173.  
  4. ^ Morgan, Henry James (1903). Types of Canadian women and of women who are or have been connected with Canada. Toronto, Ontario: William Briggs. 

External links

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Richard Sharp
Charles Bagot Chester
Member of Parliament for Castle Rising
1807–1808
With: Richard Sharp
Succeeded by
Richard Sharp
Fulk Greville Howard
Political offices
Preceded by
The Lord Sydenham
Governor General of the Province of Canada
1842–1843
Succeeded by
The Lord Metcalfe
Preceded by
Sir Richard Downes Jackson
Lieutenant Governor of Canada West
1842–1843
Lieutenant Governor of Canada East
1842–1843
Academic offices
Preceded by
The Lord Sydenham
Chancellor of King's College
1842–1843
Succeeded by
The Lord Metcalfe
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
No representation due to the War of 1812
Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the United States
1815–1820
Succeeded by
Stratford Canning
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.