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Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia

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Title: Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia  
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Subject: Czech legislative election, 2013, Czech legislative election, 2010, List of members of the European Parliament for the Czech Republic, 2004–09, List of members of the European Parliament, 2004–09, List of members of the European Parliament for the Czech Republic, 2009–14
Collection: 1989 Establishments in Czechoslovakia, 1989 in Czechoslovakia, Anti-Capitalist Political Parties, Communist Parties in the Czech Republic, Eurosceptic Parties in the Czech Republic, Left-Wing Parties in the Czech Republic, Parties Represented in the European Parliament, Political Parties Established in 1989
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Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia

Communist Party of
Bohemia and Moravia

Komunistická strana Čech a Moravy
Leader Vojtěch Filip
Founded 1989
Preceded by Communist Party of Czechoslovakia
Headquarters Politických vězňů 9, Prague
Think tank Centrum strategických a teoretických studií KSČM
Youth wing Communist Youth Union
Young Communists
Membership  (2013) 49,000[1]
Ideology Communism[2][3]
Political position Left-wing
International affiliation International Meeting of Communist and Workers' Parties
European affiliation Party of the European Left (Observer)
European Parliament group European United Left–Nordic Green Left
Colours      Red
Chamber of Deputies
33 / 200
Senate
1 / 81
European Parliament
3 / 21
Regional councils [4]
182 / 675
Local councils
2,564 / 62,300
Website
http://www.kscm.cz/
Politics of the Czech Republic
Political parties
Elections
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
the Czech Republic
Political parties
Foreign relations


Czech Republic portal

The Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia (

  • KSČM web site
  • Communist Youth Union web site
  • Dan Hough, William E. Paterson and James Sloam (eds.) Learning from the West? Policy Transfer and Programmatic Change in the Communist Successor Parties of East Central Europe. London: Routledge, 2005 (English)

External links

  1. ^ http://zpravy.idnes.cz/pocet-clenu-cxz-/domaci.aspx?c=A150401_183007_domaci_hv
  2. ^ Bozóki, A & Ishiyama, J (2002) The Communist Successor Parties of Central and Eastern Europe, pp150-153
  3. ^
  4. ^ Počty přidělených mandátů | volby.cz (Czech)
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Bozóki & Ishiyama, p146
  6. ^ a b
  7. ^ ČSSD to rule along with Communists in 10 of 13 Czech regions | Prague Monitor
  8. ^ a b Communists denounce ban on far-left youth movement | Radio Prague
  9. ^ http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/23/world/europe/23iht-czech.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0
  10. ^ http://www.halonoviny.cz/
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h Bozóki & Ishiyama, p147
  12. ^ Bozóki & Ishiyama, pp145-146
  13. ^ Bozóki & Ishiyama, pp146-147
  14. ^ a b Bozóki & Ishiyama, p157
  15. ^
  16. ^ agitprop.eu - agitprop Resources and Information. This website is for sale!
  17. ^
  18. ^ http://tema.novinky.cz/oldrich-bubenicek
  19. ^ Bozóki & Ishiyama, p155
  20. ^ Bozóki & Ishiyama, p156

References

Leaders

European Parliament
Election year # of
overall votes
% of
overall vote
# of
overall seats won
±
2004 472,862 20.3
6 / 24
2009 334,577 14.2
4 / 22
Decrease2
2014 166,478 11.0
3 / 21
Decrease1

European Parliament

Senate
Election year First Round Second Round # of
overall seats won
±
# of
overall votes
% of
overall vote
# of
overall votes
% of
overall vote
1996 393,494 14.3 45,304 2.0
2 / 81
1998 159,123 16.5 31,097 5.8
4 / 81
Increase2
2000 152,934 17.8 73,372 13.0
3 / 81
Decrease1
2002 110,171 16.5 57,434 7.0
3 / 81
Steady0
2004 125,892 17.4 65,136 13.6
2 / 81
Decrease1
2006 134,863 12.7 26,001 4.5
2 / 81
Steady0
2008 147,186 14.1
3 / 81
Increase1
2010 117,374 10.2
2 / 81
Decrease1
2012 153,335 17.4 79,663 15.5
2 / 81
Steady0
2014 99,973 9.74
1 / 81
Decrease1

Senate (Upper House)

  1. ^ In 1992 KSČM participated in the Left Bloc, an electoral alliance with smaller leftwing groups and independents.[5]

Notes:

Chamber of Deputies
Election year # of
overall votes
% of
overall vote
# of
overall seats won
±
1990 954,690 13.2
33 / 200
1992 909,490 14.0[1]
35 / 200
Increase2
1996 626,136 10.3
22 / 200
Decrease13
1998 658,550 11.0
24 / 200
Increase2
2002 882,653 18.5
41 / 200
Increase17
2006 685,328 12.8
26 / 200
Decrease15
2010 589,765 11.3
26 / 200
Steady0
2013 741,044 14.9
33 / 200
Increase7

Chamber of Deputies (Lower House)

Parliament of the Czech Republic

The KSČM's strongest bases of support are in the regions hit by deindustrialization, particularly in Karlovy Vary and Ústí nad Labem. In 2012 it won the regional election for the first time, in the Ústí nad Labem region. Its regional leader Oldřich Bubeníček then became first communist regional governor in the history of Czech republic.[18] The party is stronger with older voters than younger voters, with the majority of the membership being over 60.[19] The party is also stronger in small and medium-sized towns than in big cities,[20] with Prague consistently being the party's weakest region. It is a third largest party in the Czech Chamber of Deputies, position it held continuously after all elections to this chamber in the history of Czech republic except those in 2010, when it came fourth.

Popular support and electoral results

In November 2008, the Senate of the Czech Republic asked the Supreme Administrative Court to dissolve the Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia because of its political program, which the Senate claimed contradicted the Constitution of the Czech Republic. 30 out of the 38 senators who were present agreed to this request and expressed the viewpoint that the program of KSČM does not disown violence as a means of attaining power and adopts The Communist Manifesto of Karl Marx.[17] This was howerer only symbolic gesture because according to the Constitution only the Cabinet might file petition to dissolve political party to Supreme Administrative Court.

After a long-running battle with the Ministry of the Interior, in 2006 the KSCM's youth section — the Communist Youth Union (KSM) led by Milan Krajča — was dissolved, allegedly for endorsing in its program the replacement of private with collective ownership of the means of production.[8] The decision met with international protests.[16]

The party was left on the sidelines for most of the first decade of the Czech Republic's existence. Václav Havel suspected the KSČM was still an unreconstructed Stalinist party and kept it from having any influence during his presidency. However, the party provided the one-vote margin that elected Havel's successor Václav Klaus as president.[15]

The expelled members of 'For Socialism' formed the 'Party of Czechoslovak Communists' (later renamed the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia), led by Miroslav Štěpán.[14] The Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia refuses to work with this group.

After the party's second congress in 1992, several groups split away. A group of postcommunist delegates split off and merged with the Party of Democratic Labour to form the Party of the Democratic Left (SDL).[11] Several independent left-wing members who had participated with the KSČM in the 1992 electoral pact called the Left Bloc left the party to form the Left Bloc Party (SLB).[11] Both groups eventually merged into the Party of Democratic Socialism (PDS),[14] which does some joint work, and co-operates with the Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia. Svoboda also left the party and eventually joined the ČSSD in 1997. Several smaller groups split away.

At the 1993 congress, held in Prostějov, Svoboda's proposals were overwhelmingly rejected by two-thirds majorities.[11] Svoboda did not seek reelection as chairman, and neocommunist Miroslav Grebeníček was elected chairman.[11] Grebeníček and his supporters were critical of what they termed the "inadequacies" of the pre-1989 regime but supported the retention of the party's communist character and program.[11] The members of the 'For Socialism' platform were expelled at the congress, with the existence of "platforms" in the party being banned altogether, on the grounds they gave too much influence to minority groups.[11]

In 1993, Svoboda attempted to expel the members of the 'For Socialism' platform, a group in the party that wanted a restoration of the pre-1989 communist regime.[13] However, with only the lukewarm support of the KSČM's Central Committee, he briefly resigned. He withdrew his resignation after the Central Committee agreed to move the party's next congress forward to June 1993 to resolve the issues of its name and ideology.[11]

The party's second congress, held in Kladno in December 1992, showed the increasing popularity of the party's anti-revisionist wing.[5] It passed resolutions reinterpreting the 1990 program as a "starting point" for the KSČM, rather than a definitive statement of a post-communist program.[5] Svoboda, who was hospitalized due to an attack by an anti-communist extremist, couldn't attend the congress but was nevertheless overwhelmingly reelected.[5]

During 1991 and 1992 factional tensions increased, with the party's conservative anti-revisionist wing increasingly vocal in criticizing Svoboda.[5] There was an increase in popularity of the anti-revisionist Marxist–Leninist Clubs amongst rank and file party members.[5] On the party's other wing, the Democratic Left became increasingly critical of the slow pace of the reforms and began demanding a referendum of members to change the name.[5] In December 1991 the Democratic Left split off and formed the short-lived Party of Democratic Labour.[5] The referendum on changing the name was eventually held in 1992, with 75.94% voting to retain the current name.[5]

During the party's first congress, held in Olomouc in October 1990, the party's then-leader, Jiří Svoboda, attempted to reform the party into a democratic socialist one, proposing a democratic socialist program and changing the name to the transitional "Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia: Party of Democratic Socialism."[12] Svoboda had to balance the criticisms of older conservative communists, who made up a majority of the party's members, with the demands of an increasingly large and moderate bloc of members, led primarily by a group of young KSČM parliamentarians called the Democratic Left, who demanded the immediate social democratization of the party.[5] Delegates approved the new program but rejected the name change.[5]

In 1990, the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia, a federation of the Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia and the Communist Party of Slovakia, was formed. Later, the Communist Party of Slovakia changed its name to the Party of the Democratic Left, and the federation broke up in 1992.

[11] The Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia was formed in 1989 by the Congress of the

History

Contents

  • History 1
  • Popular support and electoral results 2
    • Parliament of the Czech Republic 2.1
      • Chamber of Deputies (Lower House) 2.1.1
      • Senate (Upper House) 2.1.2
    • European Parliament 2.2
  • Leaders 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

[10].Haló noviny Until 2013 it was the only political party in Czech republic printing its own newspapers, called [9] and there have been calls from other parties to outlaw the Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia.[8][6]

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