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Cornelius Michael Power

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Title: Cornelius Michael Power  
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Subject: Roman Catholic Diocese of Yakima, Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Portland in Oregon, Elden Francis Curtiss, William Levada, Robert Joseph Dwyer
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Cornelius Michael Power

Styles of
Cornelius Power
Reference style The Most Reverend
Spoken style Your Excellency
Religious style Bishop
Posthumous style none

Cornelius Michael Power (December 18, 1913—May 22, 1997) was an American prelate of the Roman Catholic Church. He served as Archbishop of Portland from 1974 to 1986.

Biography

Cornelius Power was born to Pomeroy, Washington.

Power was Domestic Prelate of His Holiness on January 12, 1963.

On February 5, 1969, Power was appointed the second Bishop of Yakima by Pope Paul VI. He received his episcopal consecration on the following May 1 from Archbishop Thomas Connolly, with Bishops Thomas Gill and Joseph Dougherty serving as co-consecrators. He assumed as his episcopal motto: Servite Domino In Laetitia, meaning, "I will serve God cheerfully." Power was later named the seventh Archbishop of Portland in Oregon on January 15, 1974, being formally installed on April 17 in the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception.

During his tenure in Portland, he formed a five-year plan for the Archdiocese and ensured its financial stability by establishing an endowment fund. Power founded the Oregon Catholic Conference, held the first clergy and archdiocesan conventions, and reorganized the local curia, Catholic Charities, and Catholic Truth Society of Oregon, which was renamed the Oregon Catholic Press. He also encouraged ministries to Spanish-speaking and Southeast Asian residents. The Archbishop retired on July 1, 1986, after twelve years of service; he spent his retirement in providing retreats and assistance to parishes.

As a close family friend of Seattle's civic leader Jack Gordon, Power was called upon for things such as giving invocations at Seattle's Century 21.[1] He was a featured speaker at Gordon's retirement.[2]

Power died in Portland, at age 83. He is buried at Mount Calvary Cemetery.[3]

References

External links

  • Catholic-Hierarchy
  • Archdiocese of Portland
Preceded by
Joseph Patrick Dougherty
Bishop of Yakima
1969–1974
Succeeded by
Nicolas Eugene Walsh
Preceded by
Robert Joseph Dwyer
Archbishop of Portland
1974–1986
Succeeded by
William Joseph Levada

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