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DeAndre Jordan

DeAndre Jordan
Jordan with the Clippers
No. 6 – Los Angeles Clippers
Position Center
League NBA
Personal information
Born (1988-07-21) July 21, 1988
Houston, Texas
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 11 in (2.11 m)
Listed weight 265 lb (120 kg)
Career information
High school Christian Life Center Academy
(Humble, Texas)
College Texas A&M (2007–2008)
NBA draft 2008 / Round: 2 / Pick: 35th overall
Selected by the Los Angeles Clippers
Pro career 2008–present
Career history
2008–present Los Angeles Clippers
Career highlights and awards
Stats at NBA.com
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Hyland DeAndre Jordan, Jr. (born July 21, 1988) is an American professional basketball Center (basketball) with the Los Angeles Clippers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). Standing at 6 ft 11 in (2.11 m), he plays the Center (basketball) position. He played a year of college basketball at Texas A&M University. He was drafted by the Clippers with the 35th overall pick in the 2008 NBA draft.

Contents

  • Early years 1
  • College career 2
  • Professional career 3
  • Personal life 4
  • NBA career statistics 5
    • Regular season 5.1
    • Playoffs 5.2
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Early years

Jordan was born in Houston, Texas to Kimberly and Hyland Jordan.

In high school, Jordan averaged 15.0 points, 12.0 rebounds and 4.0 blocks as a sophomore; 16.5 points, 14.0 rebounds and 7.0 blocks as a junior and 26.1 points, 15.2 rebounds and 8.1 blocks per game as a senior. He was a Parade All-American, named to the first-team All-Greater Houston squad by the Houston Chronicle and was a two-time all-state selection. At Christian Life Center, Jordan posted a career high of 37 points in a game and also set the school record for most blocks in a game with 20.

Coming out of high school, Jordan was rated as the number 8 overall prospect, the number 2 center in the country and the number 1-ranked prep player in Texas by Rivals.com. Jordan was recruited by Florida, Florida State, Indiana, Texas, Texas A&M, LSU, Kentucky and others.[1]

In the summer of 2007, Jordan played for Team USA at the 2007 Under 19 World Championships in Serbia. Jordan played only 9 minutes per game. The team finished 2nd with an 8–1 record.[2]

College career

Before Jordan arrived in College Station, Aggies head basketball coach Billy Gillispie left the school to take the head coaching position at Kentucky. Jordan chose to honor his commitment to the university.

Jordan started 21 of 35 games in his freshman season at Texas A&M. He averaged 20 minutes and 1.3 blocks per game. In those games, he shot a team-high of 61.7 percent in field goals, but a team-low of 43.7 percent in free throws. Most of his field goals, however, were within a few feet from the basket.[3] He finished the season averaging 7.9 points and 6.0 rebounds.[4] He made the Big 12 All-Rookie Team for his efforts.[5] After the season, he declared for the 2008 NBA Draft.[6][7]

Prior to the draft, draftexpress.com, a third party NBA draft website, listed Jordan's strengths and weaknesses. A few strengths include "incredible physical specimen", "defensive potential", "incredible upside", and "freakish athlete". Some weaknesses include "not productive", "poor fundamentals", "mediocre footwork", and "high bust potential".[8] The website also projected him to be picked at No. 16 by the Philadelphia 76ers.[9] Other mock drafts had him projected to be picked at No. 10 by the New Jersey Nets or at No. 11 by the Indiana Pacers due to his attractive ability to run the floor.[3] ESPN's Chad Ford had him going to the Memphis Grizzlies at pick No. 28 in the first round.[10][11][12][13]

Professional career

Jordan was selected with the 35th overall pick by the Los Angeles Clippers in the 2008 NBA draft. Due to injuries among the Clippers' low post players, Jordan was pushed into the starting lineup for the January 19, 2009 game against the Minnesota Timberwolves. In his first game as a starter, he recorded 6 blocks, 10 rebounds, and 8 points in 34 minutes of game play. In the January 21, 2009 game against the Los Angeles Lakers, he played 43 minutes and recorded a career-high 23 points. This included 10 dunks, which had only been accomplished by two players (Dwight Howard and Shaquille O'Neal) over the past 10 NBA seasons.[14]

On December 11, 2011, Jordan signed an offer sheet with the Golden State Warriors reportedly worth $43 million for 4 years.[15] However, one day later, Clippers decided to match the offer and keep him.[16]

For the 2011–12 NBA season, Jordan changed his jersey number from 9 to 6.[17] On December 25, 2011, Jordan recorded a career high 8 blocks against the Golden State Warriors in an opening day 105–86 victory.

During the 2012–13 NBA season, Jordan's free throw percentage dropped from 52.5% to 38.6%, which was one of his career worsts. However, he led the league in field goal percentage, shooting 64.3%. This was his first season playing all 82 games.

In 2013, Jordan was selected to Team USA's minicamp in Las Vegas.[18] On November 29, 2013, Jordan recorded a career high 9 blocks in the 104-98 victory against the Sacramento Kings. On January 3, 2014, Jordan scored a career-high 25 points in a 119-112 victory against the Dallas Mavericks. With 13.6 rebounds per game, he was the league's rebounding leader for the 2013–14 season.

On April 29, 2014, Jordan became the first NBA player with at least 25 points, 18 rebounds and four blocked shots in a playoff game since Tim Duncan in 2008.[19]

Personal life

Jordan is a Christian. Jordan prays frequently and has spoken about his faith saying, "... I know my relationship with Christ, and I know what He has done for me, and that is what I live on."[20] Jordan has a tattoo of Matthew 5:4-5 on his chest,[21] a Christian cross on his left arm,[22] the Serenity Prayer and his own message saying "I thank God for the gift that he has given me. I will honor, sacrifice, and dedicate myself to my talent. I know where I have come from but I know where I am going" on his right arm,[23][24] and Philippians 4:13 and praying hands with G.W.O.M (God Watch Over Me) on his stomach.[25]

NBA career statistics

Led the league

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2008–09 L.A. Clippers 53 13 14.5 .633 .000 .385 4.5 .2 .2 1.1 4.3
2009–10 L.A. Clippers 70 12 16.2 .605 .000 .375 5.0 .3 .2 .9 4.8
2010–11 L.A. Clippers 80 66 25.6 .686 .000 .452 7.2 .5 .5 1.8 7.1
2011–12 L.A. Clippers 66 66 27.2 .632 .000 .525 8.3 .3 .5 2.0 7.4
2012–13 L.A. Clippers 82 82 24.5 .643 .000 .386 7.2 .3 .6 1.4 8.8
2013–14 L.A. Clippers 82 82 35.0 .676 .000 .428 13.6 .9 1.0 2.5 10.4
Career 443 331 23.8 .644 .000 .422 7.9 .4 .5 1.6 7.4

Playoffs

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2012 L.A. Clippers 11 11 22.6 .525 .000 .333 5.3 .4 .6 1.6 4.5
2013 L.A. Clippers 6 6 24.0 .455 .000 .222 6.3 .2 .2 1.7 3.7
2014 L.A. Clippers 13 13 34.0 .730 .000 .434 12.5 .8 .9 2.5 9.6
Career 30 30 27.8 .616 .000 .394 8.6 .5 .7 2.0 6.6

References

  1. ^ DeAndre Jordan – Basketball Recruiting. Tamu.alliancesports.com. Retrieved on March 11, 2013 .
  2. ^ Real Insight. Real Fans. Real Conversations. Sporting News. Retrieved on March 11, 2013.
  3. ^ a b Zwerneman Brent (June 23, 2008) NBA: A&M's Jordan brings highs and lows to draft. mysanantonio.com
  4. ^ Jordan's game trying to catch up with his body – Men's College Basketball – ESPN. Sports.espn.go.com (June 12, 2008). Retrieved on March 11, 2013.
  5. ^ 2008 Phillips 66 All-Big 12 Men's Basketball Awards Selected. big12sports.com, March 10, 2008
  6. ^ Fagan, Ryan (June 22, 2008) Counterpoint: DeAndre Jordan is a bust in the making. sportingnews.com
  7. ^ DeCourcy, Mike (June 22, 2008) Counterpoint: Draft DeAndre Jordan. sportingnews.com
  8. ^ DraftExpressProfile: DeAndre Jordan, Stats, Comparisons, and Outlook. Draftexpress.com. Retrieved on March 11, 2013.
  9. ^ Mock Draft. DraftExpress. Retrieved on March 11, 2013.
  10. ^ Chad Ford's Mock Draft, Version 6.0: Picks 1–30 – NBA – ESPN. Sports.espn.go.com (June 23, 2008). Retrieved on March 11, 2013.
  11. ^ [1]
  12. ^ A&M's Jordan presents difficult decision in NBA draft – Houston Chronicle. Chron.com (June 25, 2008). Retrieved on March 11, 2013.
  13. ^ Sherrington, Kevin (June 26, 2008) Upside has downside for Texas A&M's DeAndre Jordan. Dallas News
  14. ^ Daily Dime: Bynum plays Duncan to a standstill – NBA – ESPN
  15. ^ "Warriors Sign Center DeAndre Jordan To Offer Sheet".  
  16. ^ "CLIPPERS MATCH OFFER SHEET, RE-SIGN DEANDRE JORDAN".  
  17. ^ "Great Expectations for DeAndre Jordan". NBA.com. December 16, 2011. Retrieved December 20, 2011. 
  18. ^ Twenty-Seven Players Confirmed For 2013 USA Basketball Men’s National Team Mini-Camp
  19. ^ Notebook: Clippers 113, Warriors 103
  20. ^ "Los Angeles Clippers center Jordan presses forward with faith". 
  21. ^ "DeAndre Jordan’s Ink". 
  22. ^ "DeAndre Jordan’s Ink". 
  23. ^ "DeAndre Jordan’s Ink". 
  24. ^ "DeAndre Jordan’s Ink". 
  25. ^ "DeAndre Jordan’s Ink". 

External links

  • NBA.com Profile
  • ESPN.com Profile
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