World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Digital Speech Standard

Article Id: WHEBN0000798376
Reproduction Date:

Title: Digital Speech Standard  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Digital dictation, Speech codecs, Audio codecs, DSS, Audio file format
Collection: Audio Codecs, Digital Dictation, Speech Codecs
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Digital Speech Standard

Digital Speech Standard (DSS) is a proprietary compressed digital audio file format defined by the International Voice Association, a co-operative venture by Olympus, Philips and Grundig. It was originally developed in 1994 by Grundig with the University of Nuremberg. In 1997, the digital speech standard was released, which was based on the previous codec. It is commonly used on digital dictation recorders.

The DSS file format stores voice audio data in a highly compressed format that allows basic recording functionality (such as recording, playing, rewinding, etc.) as well as the ability to record in either insert or overwrite mode making it ideal for dictation. This along with ability to include additional information in the file header for the transcriptionist including priority mark, author, job type, etc.

DSS is a format designed specifically for speech, equivalent to MP3 for music. In contrast with MP3, however, the quality usually is as low as possible, to minimize the size of the file.

External links

  • Philips Dictation Systems- Website of Philips Dictation Systems
  • Olympus Professional Dictation- Website of Olympus Professional Dictation
  • Olympus.
  • Express Scribe DSS player and transcription assistant from NCH Software

See also


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.