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Dover Demon

 

Dover Demon

Dover Demon
Country United States
Region Dover, Massachusetts

The Dover Demon is a creature reportedly sighted in the town of Dover, Massachusetts on April 21 and April 22, 1977.

History

Seventeen-year-old William Bartlett claimed that while driving on April 21, 1977 he saw a large-eyed creature "with tendril-like fingers" and glowing eyes on top of a broken stone wall on Farm Street in Dover, Massachusetts. Fifteen-year-old John Baxter reported seeing a similar creature in heavily wooded area on Miller Hill Road the same evening. Another 15-year-old, Abby Brabham, claimed to have seen the creature the following night sitting upright on Springdale Avenue. The teenagers all drew sketches of the alleged creature. Bartlett wrote on his sketch, "I, Bill Bartlett, swear on a stack of Bibles that I saw this creature." According to the Boston Globe, "the locations of the sightings, plotted on a map, lay in a straight line over 2 miles".[1]

Some suggested that the creature may have been a foal or a moose calf.[1] Police told the Associated Press that creatures reported by the teenagers "were probably nothing more than a school vacation hoax."[2]

The Dover Demon went on to gain worldwide attention, and drew comparison to stories such as that of Bigfoot and the Loch Ness monster. It has been written about by Cryptozoologist Loren Coleman.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c Sullivan, Mark (October 29, 2006). "Decades later, the Dover Demon still haunts". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 7 March 2014. 
  2. ^ "'"Teeners report 'creature. Associated Press. May 16, 1977. Retrieved 10 March 2014. 

External links

  • Loren Coleman, Mysterious America: The Revised Edition (NY: Paraview, 2001, ISBN 1-931044-05-8)
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