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Eavesdropping

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Title: Eavesdropping  
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Subject: Espionage, Surveillance, Authentication protocol, Computer security, Party line (telephony)
Collection: Espionage Techniques, Fiction, Plot (Narrative)
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Eavesdropping

"Belly-buster" hand-crank audio drill, used during the late 1950s and early 1960s to drill holes into masonry for implanting audio devices
A fiber-optic splitter, a modern method of eavesdropping.

Eavesdropping is secretly listening to the private conversation of others without their consent, as defined by Black's Law Dictionary.[1] This is commonly thought to be unethical and there is an old adage that "eavesdroppers seldom hear anything good of themselves... eavesdroppers always try to listen to matters that concern them."[2]

Contents

  • Etymology 1
  • Techniques 2
  • References 3
  • See also 4
  • External links 5

Etymology

The verb eavesdrop was originally a back-formation of the noun eavesdropper ("a person who eavesdrops") which was formed from the unrelated noun eavesdrop ("the dripping of water from the eaves of a house; the ground on which such water falls"). An eavesdropper was one who stood at the eavesdrop (where the water fell, i.e., near the house) so as to overhear what was said inside.[3][4]

Techniques

Eavesdropping can also be done over telephone lines (wiretapping), email, instant messaging, and other methods of communication considered private. (If a message is publicly broadcast, witnessing it is not considered eavesdropping.) VoIP communications software is also vulnerable to electronic eavesdropping via infections such as trojans.

References

  1. ^ Garner, p. 550
  2. ^ Ronald R. Kline (2000). Consumers in the Country. Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins Univ. Press. p. 46. 
  3. ^  
  4. ^ "eavesdrop".  

See also

External links

  • The dictionary definition of eavesdropping at Wiktionary
  • Media related to at Wikimedia Commons
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