World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Empty sella syndrome

Article Id: WHEBN0004294023
Reproduction Date:

Title: Empty sella syndrome  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Sella turcica, Hypopituitarism, Hypothyroidism, Obesity, MODY 3
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Empty sella syndrome

Empty sella syndrome
Classification and external resources
ICD-9 253.8
DiseasesDB 31523
MedlinePlus 000349
MeSH D004652
Empty sella in MRI (T2w sagittal)

Empty sella syndrome (abbreviated ESS) is a disorder that involves the sella turcica "Turkish Saddle", a bony structure at the base of the brain that surrounds and protects the pituitary gland. ESS is a condition that is often discovered during tests for pituitary disorders, when radiological imaging of the pituitary gland reveals a sella turcica that appears to be empty ("partially empty sella"). The pituitary gland shrinks or becomes flattened. [1]

Contents

  • Classification 1
  • Associated conditions and diagnosis 2
  • Treatment 3
  • Prognosis 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Classification

There are two types of ESS: primary and secondary.

  • Primary ESS happens when a small anatomical defect above the pituitary gland increases pressure in the sella turcica and causes the gland to flatten out along the interior walls of the sella turcica cavity. Primary ESS is associated with obesity and high blood pressure in women. The disorder can be a sign of idiopathic intracranial hypertension.
  • Secondary ESS is the result of the pituitary gland regressing within the cavity after an injury, surgery, or radiation therapy. Individuals with secondary ESS due to destruction of the pituitary gland have symptoms that reflect the loss of pituitary functions, such as the ceasing of menstrual periods, infertility, fatigue, and intolerance to stress and infection.

Associated conditions and diagnosis

ESS may be associated with early onset of puberty, growth hormone deficiency, pituitary tumors, or pituitary gland dysfunction.

MRI scans are useful in evaluating ESS and differentiating it from other disorders that produce an enlarged sella.

Treatment

Unless the syndrome results in other medical problems, treatment for endocrine dysfunction associated with pituitary malfunction is symptomatic and supportive. In some cases, surgery may be needed.

Prognosis

ESS is not a life-threatening illness.

References

  1. ^ http://www.umm.edu/ency/article/000349.htm

External links

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.