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Encephalopathy

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Title: Encephalopathy  
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Encephalopathy

Encephalopathy
Classification and external resources
Specialty Neurology
ICD-10 G93.4
ICD-9-CM 348.30
MeSH D001927

Encephalopathy means disorder or disease of the brain.[1] In modern usage, encephalopathy does not refer to a single disease, but rather to a syndrome of overall brain dysfunction; this syndrome can have many different organic and inorganic causes.

Contents

  • Terminology 1
  • Signs and symptoms 2
  • Causes 3
  • Diagnosis 4
  • Treatment 5
  • Prognosis 6
  • See also 7
  • References 8
  • Further reading 9

Terminology

In some contexts, it refers to permanent (or degenerative)[2] brain injury, and in others it is reversible. It can be due to direct injury to the brain, or illness remote from the brain. In medical terms it can refer to a wide variety of brain disorders with very different etiologies, prognoses and implications. For example, prion diseases, all of which cause transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, are invariably fatal, but other encephalopathies are reversible and can have a number of causes including nutritional deficiencies and toxins.

Signs and symptoms

The hallmark of encephalopathy is an altered mental state. Depending on the type and severity of encephalopathy, common neurological symptoms are loss of cognitive function, subtle personality changes, inability to concentrate, lethargy, and depressed consciousness. Other neurological signs may include myoclonus (involuntary twitching of a muscle or group of muscles), asterixis (abrupt loss of muscle tone, quickly restored), nystagmus (rapid, involuntary eye movement), tremor, seizures, jactitation (restless picking at things characteristic of severe infection), and respiratory abnormalities such as Cheyne-Stokes respiration (cyclic waxing and waning of tidal volume), apneustic respirations and post-hypercapnic apnea.

Causes

There are many types of encephalopathy. Some examples include:

Diagnosis

Blood tests, cerebrospinal fluid examination by lumbar puncture (also known as spinal tap), brain imaging studies, electroencephalograms and similar diagnostic studies may be used to differentiate the various causes of encephalopathy.

Diagnosis is frequently clinical. That is, no set of tests give the diagnosis, but the entire presentation of the illness with nonspecific test results informs the experienced clinician of the diagnosis.

Treatment

Treatment varies according to the type and severity of the encephalopathy. Anticonvulsants may be prescribed to reduce or halt any seizures. Changes to diet and nutritional supplements may help some patients. In severe cases, dialysis or organ replacement surgery may be needed.

Prognosis

Treating the underlying cause of the disorder may improve or reverse symptoms. However, in some cases, the encephalopathy may cause permanent structural changes and irreversible damage to the brain. These permanent deficits can be considered a form of stable dementia. Some encephalopathies can be fatal.

See also

References

  1. ^ "eMedicine/Stedman Medical Dictionary Lookup!". Retrieved 2008-11-30. 
  2. ^ "encephalopathy" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary
  3. ^ Müller M, Baumeier A, Ringelstein E, Husstedt I (2008). "Long-term tracking of neurological complications of encephalopathy and myopathy in a patient with nephropathic cystinosis: a case report and review of the literature". J Med Case Reports 2: 235.  
  • Adapted from: Office of Communications and Public Liaison (9 November 2010). "NINDS Encephalopathy Information Page".  

Further reading

  • The Diagnosis of Stupor and Coma by Plum and Posner, ISBN 0-19-513898-8, remains one the of best detailed observational references to the condition.
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