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FC Zürich

Zürich
Full name Fussballclub Zürich
Founded 1896
Ground Letzigrund, Zürich
Ground Capacity 25,000
Chairman Ancillo Canepa
Manager Sami Hyypiä
League Swiss Super League
2014–15 Swiss Super League, 3rd
Website Club home page

Fussballclub Zürich, commonly abbreviated to FC Zürich, FCZ or simply Zürich, is a Swiss football club from the city of Zürich. The club was founded in 1896 and have won the Swiss Super League 12 times and the Swiss Cup 8 times. The club won the 2009 Swiss Super League and last won the Swiss Cup in 2014. They play their home games at the Letzigrund in Zürich, which seats 25,000.

Contents

  • History 1
    • 1896–1924 1.1
    • 1925–1960 1.2
    • 1960–1981 1.3
    • 1981–2005 1.4
    • Recent years 1.5
  • Honours 2
  • Rivalries 3
    • Zürich Derby 3.1
    • Final vs. Basel, 13 May 2006 3.2
  • Current squad 4
    • Notable former players 4.1
    • Player records 4.2
  • Managers 5
  • FC Zürich in Europe 6
  • External links 7

History

1896–1924

The club was founded on 1 August 1896 by former members of the three local clubs (FC Turicum, FC Viktoria, and FC Excelsior). One of them was the FC Barcelona founder, Joan Gamper.

Zürich won its first title in the Swiss Super League in 1901–02, but did not win it again until 1923–24.

Until the 1930s, the club's sporting remit also included rowing, boxing, athletics, and handball, but later focused solely on football.

1925–1960

Between 1925 and 1960, Zürich were in the "wilderness years," devoid of success. The club struggled to keep in the top flight and were relegated from the Super League in 1933–34, playing in the Challenge League until 1941. In 1940–41, they returned to the Super League, where they stayed until their relegation in the 1945–46. They were back in the Super League in 1947–48 and stayed in the top flight until relegated once more in 1956–57. They were promoted from the Challenge League to contest the 1958–59 Swiss Super League, finishing in third place.

1960–1981

This period was known as the "Golden Years" by the FCZ faithful. At this time, the club was run by the legendary President Edwin Nägeli and had players such as Köbi Kuhn, Fritz Künzli, Ilija Katić, René Botteron, and many more. Zürich won seven championships in the years 1963, 1966, 1968, 1974, 1975, 1976 and 1981. They also won the Swiss Cup five times in 1966, 1970, 1972, 1973, and in 1976. FCZ also had some success in Europe getting to the semi-finals of the European Cup 1963–64, before losing to Real Madrid and also reaching the semi-finals in the European Cup 1976–77, where they lost to Liverpool.

1981–2005

Following the club's league title in 1981, the club went into a decline and in 1988, the club was relegated to the Challenge League. Zürich returned to the top league in 1990. The club did make it to last 16 of the UEFA Cup 1998–99, but were beaten by Roma. The club won the Swiss Cup in 2000, beating Lausanne in the final and also in 2005 beating Luzern.

Recent years

On 13 May 2006, FCZ ended their 25 years wait for a league title with a dramatic final day victory against Basel to win the Super League. They won thanks to a goal scored in the 93rd minute by Iulian Filipescu. The goal gave FCZ a 2 – 1 victory and secured the title on goal difference over Basel. In 2006–07, they also won the league.

In the 2007–08 season, FCZ finished in third place. In the 2008–09 season, they won the league, edging out BSC Young Boys. In the 2010–11 season FCZ finished second.

Honours

Rivalries

Local club Grasshopper, along with Basel, are the main rivals of FCZ. Due to the intense rivalry, these matches are so-called "High Risk Games," with an increased police presence in and around the stadium.

Zürich Derby

FCZ vs. GCZ: The Zürich Derby in 2009.

Since its inception, FCZ has always had a fiery relationship with neighbouring club Grasshopper over sporting supremacy in the city. Grasshoppers are known as the club of the elite and FCZ are known as the club of the workers. The matches between the two clubs are the only true local derby in the Swiss Super League.

Final vs. Basel, 13 May 2006

Before the last round of the 2005–06 Swiss Super League, Zürich were three points behind Basel in the league table. The last game of the season was contested by these two clubs vying for the league title at St. Jakob Park, Basel. Alhassane Keita scored the first goal for Zürich. In the second half, Mladen Petrić equalised. Basel were seconds away from the title when in the 93rd minute, Florian Stahel passed the ball to Iulian Filipescu, who scored and made it 2 – 1 for Zürich. Zürich won the league title due to their superior goal difference. After the final whistle, the field was stormed by Basel supporters who also attacked Zürich players (see 2006 Basel Hooligan Incident).

Current squad

Updated 31 August 2015.

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.
No. Position Player
1 GK Yanick Brecher
2 DF Leandro Di Gregorio
5 DF Berat Djimsiti
6 MF Cabral
7 FW Mario Gavranović
8 MF Christian Schneuwly
9 FW Amine Chermiti
10 MF Davide Chiumiento
11 FW Armando Sadiku
13 DF Alain Nef
14 FW Franck Etoundi
15 MF Oliver Buff
16 DF Philippe Koch
19 DF Armin Alesevic
No. Position Player
20 MF Burim Kukeli
21 MF Mike Kleiber
22 MF Anto Grgic
23 MF Artem Simonyan
25 DF Ivan Kecojević
26 MF Cédric Brunner
27 MF Marco Schönbächler
28 DF Vinícius Freitas
29 MF Sangoné Sarr
31 GK Novem Baumann
32 GK Anthony Favre
33 MF Kevin Bua
34 MF Maxime Dominguez
37 MF Gilles Yapi Yapo

Notable former players

See also Category:FC Zürich players.

Player records

Managers

See also Category:FC Zürich managers.

FC Zürich in Europe

  • Q = Qualifying Round
  • 1R = First Round
  • 2R = Second Round
  • PO = Play-Off
  • 1/8 = 1/8 Final
  • 1/4 = Quarterfinal
  • 1/2 = Semifinal
Season Competition Round Country Club Score
1963–64 European Cup Q Dundalk 3 – 0, 1 – 2
1/8 Galatasaray 2 – 0, 0 – 2, 2 – 2
1/4 PSV 0 – 1, 3 – 1
1/2 Real Madrid 1 – 2, 0 – 6
1966–67 European Cup 1R Celtic 0 – 2, 0 – 3
1967–68 Inter-Cities Fairs Cup 1R Barcelona 3 – 1, 0 – 1
2R Nottingham Forest 1 – 2, 1 – 0
1/8 Sporting CP 3 – 0, 0 – 1
1/4 Dundee 0 – 1, 0 – 1
1968–69 European Cup 1R AB 1 – 3, 2 – 1
1969–70 Inter-Cities Fairs Cup 1R Kilmarnock 3 – 2, 1 – 3
1970–71 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup 1R Knattspyrnufélag Akureyrar 7 – 1, 7 – 0
1/8 Club Brugge 0 – 2, 3 – 2
1972–73 Cup Winners' Cup 1R Wrexham 1 – 1, 1 – 2
1973–74 Cup Winners' Cup 1R Anderlecht 2 – 3, 1 – 0
1/8 Malmö FF 0 – 0, 1 – 1
1/4 Sporting CP 0 – 3, 1 – 1
1974–75 European Cup 1R Leeds United 1 – 4, 2 – 1
1975–76 European Cup 1R Újpest 0 – 4, 5 – 1
1976–77 European Cup 1R Rangers 1 – 1, 1 – 0
1/8 Turun Palloseura 2 – 0, 1 – 0
1/4 Dynamo Dresden 2 – 1, 2 – 3
1/2 Liverpool 1 – 3, 0 – 3
1977–78 UEFA Cup 1R CSKA Sofia 1 – 0, 1 – 1
2R Eintracht Frankfurt 0 – 3, 3 – 4
1979–80 UEFA Cup 1R Kaiserslautern 1 – 3, 1 – 5
1981–82 European Cup 1R Dynamo Berlin 0 – 2, 3 – 1
1982–83 UEFA Cup 1R Pezoporikos Larnaca 2 – 2, 1 – 0
2R Ferencváros 1 – 1, 1 – 0
1/8 Benfica 1 – 1, 0 – 4
1983–84 UEFA Cup 1R Antwerp 1 – 4, 2 – 4
1998–99 UEFA Cup 2Q Shakhtar Donetsk 4 – 0, 2 – 3
1R Anorthosis Famagusta 4 – 0, 3 – 2
2R Celtic 1 – 1, 4 – 2
1/8 Roma 0 – 1, 2 – 2
1999–00 UEFA Cup Q Sliema Wanderers 3 – 0, 1 – 0
1R Lierse 1 – 0, 4 – 3
2R Newcastle United 1 – 2, 1 – 3
2000–01 UEFA Cup 1R Racing Genk 1 – 2, 0 – 2
2005–06 UEFA Cup 2Q Legia Warsaw 1 – 0, 4 – 1
1R Brøndby 0 – 2, 2 – 1
2006–07 Champions League 2Q Red Bull Salzburg 2 – 1, 0 – 2
2007–08 UEFA Champions League 3Q Beşiktaş 1 – 1, 0 – 2
2007–08 UEFA Cup 1R Empoli 1 – 2, 3 – 0
Group E Sparta Prague 2 – 1
Toulouse 2 – 0
Spartak Moscow 0 – 1
Bayer Leverkusen 0 – 5
Round of 32 Hamburg 1 – 3, 0 – 0
2008–09 UEFA Cup 2Q Sturm Graz 1 – 1, 1 – 1
1R Milan 1 – 3, 0 – 1
2009–10 UEFA Champions League 3Q Maribor 2 – 3, 3 – 0
PO Ventspils 3 – 0, 2 – 1
Group C Real Madrid 2 – 5, 0 – 1
Milan 1 – 0, 1 – 1
Marseille 0 – 1, 1 – 6
2011–12 UEFA Champions League 3Q Standard Liège 1 – 1, 1 – 0
PO Bayern Munich 0 – 2, 0 – 1
2011–12 UEFA Europa League Group D Sporting CP 0 – 2, 0 – 2
FC Vaslui 2 – 2, 2 – 0
S.S. Lazio 1 – 1, 0 – 1
2013–14 UEFA Europa League 3Q Slovan Liberec 1 – 2, 1 – 2
2014–15 UEFA Europa League PO Spartak Trnava 3 – 1, 1 – 1
Group A Apollon Limassol 2 – 3, 3 – 1
Borussia Mönchengladbach 1 – 1, 0 – 3
Villareal CF 1 – 4, 3 – 2
2015–16 UEFA Europa League 3Q Dinamo Minsk 0 – 1, 1 – 1 (a.e.t.)

External links

  • Official Website
  • FC Zürich stats (German)
  • Archive FC Zürich (German)
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