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Fourth outfielder

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Title: Fourth outfielder  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Marie Mansfield, Marie Kruckel, Outfielder, Infielder, Flyball pitcher
Collection: Baseball Positions
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Fourth outfielder

In baseball, a fourth outfielder is a backup outfielder, who does not have the hitting skills to regularly play in the corner outfield, but does not have the fielding skills to play center field; for these players, this often leads to playing time that has been called "erratic and unpredictable".[1] Often, fourth outfielders are outfield prospects who have not settled on one outfield position when arriving in the Major Leagues,[2] veteran players seeking additional playing time to extend their careers,[3][4] or part-time position players who double as designated hitters.[1]

A current example would be Gerardo Parra of the Milwaukee Brewers.[5] Considered among the best defensive outfielders and a Rawlings Gold Glove Award winner in 2011, Parra was employed among all three outfield positions during the 2012 Major League Baseball season.

[6][7]

In contrast, the term fifth infielder does not refer to a backup or reserve infielder, but to a defensive shift where a fielder from the outfield is brought into the infield, leaving a team with only two players in the outfield.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^ http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/id/8108955/arizona-gerardo-parra-won-gold-glove-lost-starting-job
  6. ^ http://washington.nationals.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20120225&content_id=26855368&vkey=news_was&c_id=was
  7. ^ http://www.azcentral.com/sports/diamondbacks/articles/20120918arizona-diamondbacks-gerardo-parra-having-hard-time-limited-play.html


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