World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Game manager

Article Id: WHEBN0034414575
Reproduction Date:

Title: Game manager  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Quarterback, Trap run, Drop-back pass, Quarterback scramble, Off-tackle run
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Game manager

In American football, a game manager is a quarterback who, despite relatively poor individual statistics such as passing yards and touchdowns, manages to perform well enough to win games.[1][2] Game managers often benefit from strong defense and rushing offense on their teams. The player is expected to not lose games with interceptions, fumbles, or poor decisions, particularly during important situations near the end of a game.[3][4]

The New York Times called it a "backhanded compliment".[5] The San Francisco Chronicle wrote, "As consolation ... Quarterbacks are called game managers only if they're winning."[6] The Associated Press opined, "But like any cliche, [game manager is] oversimplified". Former Indianapolis Colts president Bill Polian laughed, "Every quarterback is a game manager, it's what the job is all about."[1] College coach Nick Saban added that "I don't think you can be a good quarterback unless you're a really good game manager."[7] The Los Angeles Times noted that although Trent Dilfer was not an "elite" quarterback, the 2000 Baltimore Ravens won the Super Bowl with a dominant defense and Dilfer as a game manager.[4]

References

  1. ^ a b Goldberg, Dave (November 13, 2008). "More to a QB than managing". USA Today. Associated Press. Archived from the original on January 17, 2012. 
  2. ^ Sullivan, Tim (November 13, 2011). "Though not flashy, Smith now a ‘game manager’". The San Diego Union-Tribune. Archived from the original on January 17, 2012. 
  3. ^ Maxymuk, John (2008). Strong Arm Tactics: A Historical and Statistical Analysis of the Professional Quarterback. McFarland. p. 18.  
  4. ^ a b Farmer, Sam (January 28, 2012). "In the NFL, it's (almost) all about the quarterback". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 28, 2012. 
  5. ^ Bishop, Greg (January 15, 2012). "Smith, for Once, Is a Reason for San Francisco’s Victory". The New York Times. p. SP3. Archived from the original on January 17, 2012. 
  6. ^ Knapp, Gwen (2012-01-12). "Drew Brees really pays Alex Smith a compliment". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  7. ^ Zenor, John (November 1, 2012). "Saban: Game manager label is high praise for QB". yahoo.com. Associated Press. Archived from the original on November 20, 2012. 
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.