World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Hoxd1

Article Id: WHEBN0014880288
Reproduction Date:

Title: Hoxd1  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Homeobox, Transcription factors, NeuroD, EMX homeogene, Engrailed (gene)
Collection: Transcription Factors
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Hoxd1

Homeobox D1
Identifiers
Symbols  ; HOX4; HOX4G; Hox-4.7
External IDs GeneCards:
RNA expression pattern
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)
RefSeq (protein)
Location (UCSC)
PubMed search

Homeobox protein Hox-D1 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the HOXD1 gene.[1][2][3] This gene is a member of the Antp homeobox family and encodes a protein with a homeobox DNA-binding domain. This nuclear protein functions as a sequence-specific transcription factor that is involved in differentiation and limb development. Mutations in this gene have been associated with severe developmental defects on the anterior-posterior (a-p) limb axis.[3]

Contents

  • See also 1
  • References 2
  • Further reading 3
  • External links 4

See also

References

  1. ^ McAlpine PJ, Shows TB (Aug 1990). "Nomenclature for human homeobox genes". Genomics 7 (3): 460.  
  2. ^ Scott MP (Dec 1992). "Vertebrate homeobox gene nomenclature". Cell 71 (4): 551–3.  
  3. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: HOXD1 homeobox D1". 

Further reading

  • Boncinelli E, Acampora D, Pannese M, et al. (1990). "Organization of human class I homeobox genes.". Genome 31 (2): 745–56.  
  • Manohar CF, Salwen HR, Furtado MR, Cohn SL (1996). "Up-regulation of HOXC6, HOXD1, and HOXD8 homeobox gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells following chemical induction of differentiation.". Tumour Biol. 17 (1): 34–47.  
  • Guazzi S, Lonigro R, Pintonello L, et al. (1994). "The thyroid transcription factor-1 gene is a candidate target for regulation by Hox proteins.". EMBO J. 13 (14): 3339–47.  
  • Manohar CF, Furtado MR, Salwen HR, Cohn SL (1993). "Hox gene expression in differentiating human neuroblastoma cells.". Biochem. Mol. Biol. Int. 30 (4): 733–41.  
  • Del Campo M, Jones MC, Veraksa AN, et al. (1999). "Monodactylous limbs and abnormal genitalia are associated with hemizygosity for the human 2q31 region that includes the HOXD cluster.". Am. J. Hum. Genet. 65 (1): 104–10.  
  • Adjaye J, Monk M (2000). "Transcription of homeobox-containing genes detected in cDNA libraries derived from human unfertilized oocytes and preimplantation embryos.". Mol. Hum. Reprod. 6 (8): 707–11.  
  • Limongi MZ, Pelliccia F, Gaddini L, Rocchi A (2000). "Clustering of two fragile sites and seven homeobox genes in human chromosome region 2q31→q32.1.". Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 90 (1-2): 151–3.  
  • Appukuttan B, Sood R, Ott S, et al. (2001). "Isolation and characterization of the human homeobox gene HOX D1.". Mol. Biol. Rep. 27 (4): 195–201.  
  • Pitera JE, Milla PJ, Scambler P, Adjaye J (2002). "Cloning of HOXD1 from unfertilised human oocytes and expression analyses during murine oogenesis and embryogenesis.". Mech. Dev. 109 (2): 377–81.  
  • Kosaki K, Kosaki R, Suzuki T, et al. (2002). "Complete mutation analysis panel of the 39 human HOX genes.". Teratology 65 (2): 50–62.  
  • Strausberg RL, Feingold EA, Grouse LH, et al. (2003). "Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences.". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99 (26): 16899–903.  

External links

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.



This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.