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Heather O'Neill

Heather O'Neill
Born Montreal, Quebec
Occupation writer
Notable work(s) Lullabies for Little Criminals

Heather O'Neill is a Canadian novelist, poet, short story writer, screenwriter and journalist. She was born in Montreal, but is of Southern American descent and spent part of her childhood in the American South. She currently lives in Montreal.

She published her debut novel, Lullabies for Little Criminals, in 2006. The novel was subsequently selected for the 2007 edition of Canada Reads, where it was championed by singer-songwriter John K. Samson. Lullabies won the competition.

Lullabies for Little Criminals was a publishing sensation in Canada and went on to become an international bestseller. The book sparked a bidding war for film rights. She was named by Chatelaine as one of the most influential women in Canada.

Her credits also include a screenplay, a book of poetry, and contributions to The New York Times Magazine, Public Radio International's This American Life, and the CBC's Wiretap.

Awards for Lullabies for Little Criminals and Heather O'Neill

  • Winner of Canada Reads 2007
  • Winner of the Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction 2007
  • Shortlisted for the Governor General's Award 2007
  • Shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction 2008
  • Shortlisted for the Amazon.ca/ Books in Canada First Novel Award 2007
  • Shortlisted for the Barnes and Noble Discover Great New Writers Award 2007
  • Shortlisted for the Grand Prix du Livre de Montreal 2007
  • Shortlisted for the Exclusive Books Boeke Prize South Africa 2008
  • Longlisted for the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award 2008
  • Winner, GOLD, National Magazine Awards, Best Feature Short (ELLE CANADA), 2010
  • Winner, GOLD, National Magazine Awards, Best Feature Short (CHATELAINE), 2011

External links

  • Online interview from CBC Words at Large


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