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Hilary Swank

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Hilary Swank

Hilary Swank
Swank in 2007
Born Hilary Ann Swank
(1974-07-30) July 30, 1974
Lincoln, Nebraska, U.S.
Occupation Actress, producer
Years active 1990–present
Spouse(s) Chad Lowe (m. 1997–2007)

Hilary Ann Swank (born July 30, 1974) is an American actress and producer. She has won two Academy Awards for Best Actress and received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2007.

Swank made her film debut in a minor role for Buffy the Vampire Slayer, before she made her breakout lead role in the fourth installment of the The Karate Kid franchise, The Next Karate Kid in 1994. On television, she was cast as part of the main cast in the eighth season of the drama series Beverly Hills 90210 as single mother Carly Reynolds from 1997 to 1998. Swank garnered critical acclaim for her portrayal of Brandon Teena in the 1999 biographical independent film Boys Don't Cry, which earned her the Academy Award for Best Actress and the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama. She starred in Clint Eastwood's 2004 sports drama film Million Dollar Baby as struggling-waitress-turned-boxer Maggie Fitzgerald, which won her a second Oscar and Golden Globe for Best Actress.

She starred in other films, such as The Gift (2000), Insomnia (2002), Iron Jawed Angels (2004), Red Dust (2004) The Reaping (2007), P.S. I Love You (2007), Freedom Writers (2007), Amelia (2009), New Year's Eve (2011), The Homesman (2014) and You're Not You (2014).

Contents

  • Early life 1
  • Career 2
    • 1990–1998 2.1
    • 1999–2006 2.2
    • 2007–present 2.3
  • Personal life 3
    • Human rights controversy 3.1
  • Filmography 4
  • Awards and nominations 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Early life

Swank was born in Lincoln, Nebraska.[1] Her mother, Judy Kay (née Clough),[2] was a secretary and dancer, and her father, Stephen Michael Swank, was a Chief Master Sergeant in the Oregon Air National Guard and later a traveling salesman.[3] She has a brother Daniel, who is eight years her senior.[4] Many of Swank's family members are from Ringgold County, Iowa.[1] Her maternal grandmother, Frances Martha Dominguez, was of Mexican (Spanish and Native American) descent, while Hilary's paternal grandmother was born in England; Hilary's roots also include German, other English, Swiss-German, Scottish, Scots-Irish, Welsh, and Dutch ancestry.[5][6] The surname "Swank", originally "Schwenk", is of German origin.[7]

After living in Spokane, Washington, Swank's family moved to a trailer park near Lake Samish in Bellingham, Washington, when Swank was six.[8]

She attended Happy Valley Elementary, Fairhaven Middle, then Sehome High School in Bellingham until she was sixteen.[6][9] She also competed in the Junior Olympics and the Washington state championships in swimming, and she ranked fifth in the state in all-around gymnastics. Swank made her first appearance on stage when she was nine years old, starring in The Jungle Book.[9] She became involved in school and community theater programs, including those of the Bellingham Theatre Guild and The Seattle Children's Theater.

When she was fifteen, her parents separated, and she and her mother, supportive of her daughter's desire to act, moved to Los Angeles, where they lived out of their car until Swank's mother saved enough money to rent an apartment.[8] Swank has called her mother the inspiration for her acting career and her life.[10] In California, Swank enrolled in South Pasadena High School, dropping out later. She described her time at South Pasadena High School: “I felt like such an outsider. I didn't feel like I fit in. I didn't belong in any way. I didn't even feel like the teachers wanted me there. I just felt like I wasn't seen or understood.”[8] She explained her becoming an actor out of feeling as an outsider: “As a kid I felt that I belonged only when I read a book or saw a movie, and could get involved with a character. It was natural that I became an actor because I longed so much to be those other people, or at least to play them”.[11]

Career

1990–1998

Swank made her film debut, Buffy the Vampire Slayer in a small role, after which she acted in the direct-to-video drama Quiet Days in Hollywood, where she co-starred with her future husband at the time Chad Lowe.[4] Her first leading film role was in the fourth installment of the Karate Kid series, The Next Karate Kid (1994), which utilized her gymnastics background and paired her with Pat Morita. In 1995, she appeared with British actor Bruce Payne in Kounterfeit. In 1994, she also starred in the drama Cries Unheard: The Donna Yaklich Story as the abused step-daughter who was protected by Donna (Jaclyn Smith). In September 1997, Swank played single mother Carly Reynolds in Beverly Hills, 90210 and was initially promised it would be a two-year role, but saw her character written out after 16 episodes in January 1998.[6] Swank later stated that she was devastated at being cut from the show, thinking, "If I'm not good enough for 90210, I'm not good enough for anything."[12]

1999–2006

The firing freed her to audition for the role of Brandon Teena in Boys Don't Cry. To prepare for the role, Swank lived as a man for a month and reduced her body fat to seven percent. Many critics hailed her as the best female performance of 1999 and her work ultimately won her the Golden Globe and Oscar for Best Actress.[6] Swank had earned only $75 per day for her work on the film, culminating in a total of $3,000.[13] Her earnings were so low that she had not even earned enough to qualify for health insurance.[14]

Swank again won the Best Actress Oscar and another Golden Globe, for playing a female boxer in Clint Eastwood's 2004 film Million Dollar Baby, a role for which she underwent extensive training in the ring and weight room gaining 19 pounds of muscle, aided by professional trainer Grant L Roberts.[14] With her second Oscar, she had joined the ranks of Vivien Leigh and Luise Rainer as the only actresses to have been nominated for Academy Awards twice and won both times.[15] After winning her second Oscar, she said, "I don't know what I did in this life to deserve this. I'm just a girl from a trailer park who had a dream."[14]

In 2006, Swank signed a three-year contract with Guerlain for the women's fragrance Insolence.[16] She received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on January 8, 2007 and was the 2,325th star presented.[17][18]

2007–present

In 2007, Swank starred in Freedom Writers, about how a real-life teacher, Erin Gruwell, inspired a California high school class. Many reviews of her performance were positive, with one critic noting that she "brings credibility" to the role,[19] and another stating that her performance reaches a "singular lack of artifice, stripping herself back to the bare essentials".[20] Swank next starred in the horror film The Reaping, as a debunker of religious phenomena it was released on April 5, 2007. Swank convinced the producers to move the film's setting from New England to the Deep South, and the film was being filmed in Baton Rouge, Louisiana when Hurricane Katrina struck.[21] The same year, she also appeared in the romantic drama P.S. I Love You with Gerard Butler.[21][22]

Swank portrayed the pioneering aviator Amelia Earhart in the biopic film Amelia that she also co-executive produced.[23] Filming began in summer 2008 in a number of international locations and Swank met Robert Bresnik, a San Diego artist who supported her role as Earhart by producing several photographic reproductions of the flyer, at Legoland. Bresnik's grandfather Albert Bresnik was Earhart's official photographer, and he owned the original negatives of his grandfather's shoots.[24]

In 2012, Swank's audiobook recording of Caroline Knapp's Pack of Two: The Intricate Bond Between People and Dogs was released at Audible.com.[25] In 2013, she has starred in the television film Mary and Martha along with Brenda Blethyn.[26] In 2014 Swank played the lead role in You're Not You, where she starred as Kate, a woman whose life is shattered when she develops the degenerative disease ALS. She starred alongside Emmy Rossum and Josh Duhamel.

Swank is attached to star in the Hollywood remake of Intimate Strangers.[27] It was incorrectly reported that she would play a lead role in, and produce a film adaptation of the John Marks novel Fangland.[28][29]

Personal life

Swank and First Lady Michelle Obama in 2011

While filming Quiet Days in Hollywood, Swank met and married Chad Lowe on September 28, 1997.[4][30][31] They divorced on November 1, 2007.[32] In 2006, Swank began dating her agent, John Campisi.[33] They ended their relationship in the summer of 2012.[34]

Human rights controversy

In October 2011, Swank attracted controversy for attending an event in [39]

Filmography

Film
Year Title Role Notes
1992 Buffy the Vampire Slayer Kimberly Hannah
1994 The Next Karate Kid Julie Pierce
1997 Quiet Days in Hollywood Lolita
1998 Heartwood Sylvia Orsini
1999 Boys Don't Cry Brandon Teena
2000 The Gift Valerie Barksdale
The Audition N/A Short
2001 The Affair of the Necklace Jeanne St. Rémy de Valois
2002 Insomnia Detective Ellie Burr
The Space Between N/A Short
2003 11:14 Buzzy
The Core Major Rebecca Childs
2004 Red Dust Sarah Barcant
Million Dollar Baby Maggie Fitzgerald
2006 Black Dahlia Madeleine Linscott
2007 The Reaping Katherine Winter
Freedom Writers Erin Gruwell
P. S. I Love You Holly Kennedy
2008 Birds of America Laura
2009 Amelia Amelia Earhart
2010 Conviction Betty Anne Waters
2011 The Resident Dr. Juliet Devereau
New Year's Eve Claire Morgan Segment: Times Square
2014 The Homesman Mary Bee Cuddy
You're Not You Kate Also producer
2016 Spark The Queen (voice) Filming
Television
Year Title Role Notes
1990 ABC TGIF Danielle Shorts
1991 Evening Shade Aimee No. 1 2 episodes
1991–92 Growing Pains Sasha Serotsky 2 episodes
1992–93 Camp Wilder Danielle Main role, 19 episodes
1994 Cries Unheard: The Donna Yaklich Story Patty Yaklich Television movie
1996 Terror in the Family Deena Martin Television movie
1997 Dying to Belong Lisa Connors Television movie
The Sleepwalker Killing Lauren Schall Television movie
Leaving L.A. Tiffany Roebuck Main role, 6 episodes
1997–98 Beverly Hills, 90210 Carly Reynolds Main role (season 8), 16 episodes
2004 Iron Jawed Angels Alice Paul Television movie
2013 Mary and Martha Mary Television movie
2015 The One Percent Laura Murphy Pre-Production[40]
Direct-to-video
Year Title Role Notes
1996 Sometimes They Come Back... Again Michelle Porter
Kounterfeit Coleen

Awards and nominations

Year Nominated Work Award Result
1993 Camp Wilder Young Artist Award for Best Young Actress in a New Television Series Nominated
1999 Boys Don't Cry Academy Award for Best Actress Won
Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actress Won
Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress Won
Chicago International Film Festival - Silver Hugo Award for Best Actress Won
Critics' Choice Movie Award for Best Actress Won
Dallas–Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress Won
Florida Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress Won
Gijón International Film Festival Award for Best Actress Won
Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama Won
Independent Spirit Award for Best Female Lead Won
Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress Won
Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Most Promising Newcomer Won
Molodist International Film Festival Award for Outstanding Performance Won
Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress Won
National Board of Review Award for Breakthrough Performance Won
New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress Won
Online Film & Television Association Award for Best Actress Won
Santa Fe Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress Won
Satellite Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Won
Southeastern Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress Won
Stockholm Film Festival Award for Best Actress Won
ShoWest Female Star of Tomorrow Won
Toronto Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress Won
Village Voice Film Poll - Best Lead Performance Won
National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actress 2nd Place
BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role Nominated
Empire Award for Best Actress Nominated
London Film Critics' Circle Award for Actress of the Year Nominated
MTV Movie Award for Best Breakthrough Performance Nominated
MTV Movie Award for Best Kiss Nominated
Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress Nominated
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role Nominated
Teen Choice Award for Breakthrough Performance Nominated
2000 The Gift Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress Nominated
2002 Insomnia Empire Award for Best Actress Nominated
2003 11:14 DVDX Award for Best Actress (in a DVD Premiere Movie) Nominated
2004 Iron Jawed Angels TV Land Award for Little Screen/Big Star Won
Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film Nominated
Online Film & Television Association Award for Best Actress in a Motion Picture or Miniseries Nominated
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie Nominated
Million Dollar Baby Academy Award for Best Actress Won
Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actress Won
Central Ohio Film Critics Association Award for Best Lead Performance Won
Critics' Choice Movie Award for Best Actress Won
Dallas–Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress Won
Florida Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress Won
Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama Won
Jupiter Award for Best International Actress Won
Kansas City Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress Won
National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actress Won
Online Film & Television Association Award for Best Actress Won
Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress Won
Sant Jordi Award for Best Foreign Actress Won
Satellite Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Drama Won
SESC Film Festival Award for Best International Actress Won
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role Won
St. Louis Gateway Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress Won
Utah Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress 2nd Place
Empire Award for Best Actress Nominated
MTV Movie Award for Best Performance Nominated
Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress Nominated
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture Nominated
Vancouver Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress Nominated
Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress Nominated
2007 Freedom Writers Golden Camera Award for Best International Actress Won
P.S. I Love You Golden Camera Award for Best International Actress Won
Irish Film & Television Award for Best International Actress Won
2009 Amelia Hollywood Film Festival Award for Best Actress Won
Women's Image Network Award for Outstanding Actress- Feature Film Nominated
2010 Conviction Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role Nominated
N/A Gotham Award- Tribute Award Won
2011 N/A Giffoni Film Festival-François Truffaut Award Won
The Resident Fright Meter Award for Best Actress Nominated
2014 The Homesman Women Film Critics Circle Award for Best Ensemble Won
Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actress 2nd Place
Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress Nominated
San Diego Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress Nominated
Women Film Critics Circle Award for Courage In Acting Nominated
Women Film Critics Circle Award for Invisible Woman Award Nominated
Phoenix Critics Circle Award for Best Actress Nominated

References

  1. ^ a b
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^ a b c
  5. ^ http://ethnicelebs.com/hilary-swank
  6. ^ a b c d
  7. ^
  8. ^ a b c
  9. ^ a b Biography spreads across 9 web pages. High School information is on page 2.
  10. ^
  11. ^
  12. ^
  13. ^
  14. ^ a b c
  15. ^
  16. ^
  17. ^
  18. ^
  19. ^
  20. ^
  21. ^ a b
  22. ^ Hilary Swank: Light and Shade, interview with stv.tv, December 2007 Archived November 10, 2012 at the Wayback Machine
  23. ^
  24. ^
  25. ^
  26. ^
  27. ^ Variety.com"Kelly Fremon -10 Screenwriters to Watch", by Matthew Ross,
  28. ^
  29. ^
  30. ^ http://www.extratv.com/2011/09/05/on-set-romances-biggest-breakups/#hilary_swank_and_chad_lowe
  31. ^
  32. ^
  33. ^
  34. ^
  35. ^
  36. ^
  37. ^
  38. ^
  39. ^
  40. ^

External links

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