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Holzinger-class patrol vessel

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Holzinger-class patrol vessel

Class overview
Name: Holzinger
Builders: Tampico Naval Shipyard and Salina Cruz Naval Ship Yard
Operators: Mexican Navy
Preceded by: Uribe-class patrol vessel
Succeeded by: Sierra-class patrol vessel
Built: 4
In service: 4
Active: 4
General characteristics
Type: Offshore patrol vessel
Displacement: 1022 tons (full load)
Length: 74.4 m (244 ft)
Beam: 10.5 m (34 ft)
Draught: 3.18 m (10.4 ft)
Propulsion: 2 Diesel electric drive MTU 20 V. 958TB-92 13,320 BHP.
Speed: 22 knots (maximum)
Range: 3,830 NM
Endurance: 20 days
Troops: 0
Crew: 73
Sensors and
processing systems:
2 Navigation Radars Raytheon SPS-64 (V)6A
Armament: 2 Bofors L60 40 mm AA. They are on a US MK 1 water-cooled twin mount.
Aircraft carried: 1 MBB Bo 105 Helicopter
Aviation facilities: One helicopter hangar and helipad

Holzinger class patrol vessels are offshore patrol vessels in use by the Mexican Navy. They are a Mexican design, based on the Uribe class bought to the Spanish Naval Company Empresa Nacional Bazán in 1982. Holzinger class patrol vessels have a smaller helicopter deck than the Uribe class and have main armaments (2 twin US MK1 Bofors 40 mm AA mount) at A position. They are able to operate on board helicopters (MBB Bo 105).

Uribe class ships were the first medium size vessels built by Mexican Navy. Two first hulls were built at Tampico Naval Shipyard (Tamaulipas); the second two hulls were built at Salina Cruz Naval Shipyard (Oaxaca).

Ships

  • ARM Holzinger (PO 131) (1991)
  • ARM Godínez (PO 132) (1991)
  • ARM De la Vega (PO 133) (1994)
  • ARM Berriozabal (PO 134) (1994)

References

  • Faulkner, K. (1999) Jane's Warship Recognition Guide. 2nd Edition. London: Harper Collins Publishers.
  • Friedman, N. (1997) The Naval Institute Guide to World Naval Weapons Systems, 1997-1998. US Naval Institute Press.
  • Wertheim, E. (2007) Naval Institute Guide to Combat Fleets of the World: Their Ships, Aircraft, and Systems. 15 edition. US Naval Institute Press.


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