World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Howard Sachar

Article Id: WHEBN0004146747
Reproduction Date:

Title: Howard Sachar  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Battles of Latrun (1948), Ethnic cleansing, Irgun
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Howard Sachar

Howard Morley Sachar (born February 10, 1928) is an American historian. He is [2] are widely regarded as solid reference works.[3][4][5][6]

Biography

He was born to Dr. Abram L. Sachar and his wife, Thelma Horwitz,[7] during his father's tenure as a professor of history at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.[1][8] He was born in St. Louis, Missouri and raised in Champaign, Illinois. He was the eldest of three brothers; his brother Edward J. Sachar became a pioneering biological psychiatrist and David B. Sachar became a gastroenterologist.

He completed his undergraduate education at [2]

Career

Sachar was a full-time faculty member of the Department of History and the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University for 40 years.[1] He was also a visiting professor at [2]

In 1961 he founded [2] he was able to obtain funding for the Jacob Hiatt Institute from the U.S. State Department in 1965.[1]

He is a member of the [2]

Political position

He is a member of the advisory council of the controversial lobbying organization J Street.[9]

He is an advocate of the two-state solution for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Works

  • The Course of Modern Jewish History (1959; updated 1990)[10] Lib. of Cong. Cat. No. 58-67-57
  • Aliyah: The peoples of Israel (1961)[11] Lib. of Cong. Cat. No. 61-12017
  • From the Ends of the Earth: The peoples of Israel (1964)[12] Lib. of Cong. Cat. No. 64-12064
  • The Emergence of the Middle East: 1914–1924 (1969) [13] Lib. of Cong. Cat. No. 76-79349
  • Europe Leaves the Middle East, 1936–1954 (1972)[14]
  • A History of Israel: From the rise of Zionism to our time (1976; 3rd edition 2007)[15]
  • The Man on the Camel: A novel (1980)[16]
  • Egypt and Israel (1981)[17]
  • Diaspora: An inquiry into the contemporary Jewish world (1985)[18]
  • A History of Israel, Volume II: From the aftermath of the Yom Kippur War (1987)[19]
  • The Rise of Israel: A documentary record from the nineteenth century to 1948 : a facsimile series reproducing over 1,900 documents in 39 volumes, Volume 1 (1987)[20]
  • A History of the Jews in America (1992)[21]
  • Farewell Espana: The world of the Sephardim remembered (1994; reprinted 1995)[22]
  • Israel and Europe: An Appraisal in History (1998; reprinted 2000)[23]
  • Dreamland: Europeans and Jews in the aftermath of the Great War (2002; reprinted 2003)[24]
  • A History of the Jews in the Modern World (2005; reprinted 2006)[25]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Fuchs, Sam (11 September 2009). "All in the Family: Dr. Howard Sachar and the Jacob Hiatt Institute".  
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "Emeritus Faculty: Howard M. Sacher".  
  3. ^ Benn, Aluf (11 December 2009). "What To Read On Israeli Politics". Council on Foreign Relations. Retrieved 31 January 2011. 
  4. ^ Kaufmann, David (16 December 2005). "Narrative History in the Grand Tradition".  
  5. ^ Zipperstein, Steven J. (4 September 2005). A History of the Jews in the Modern World': The Best of Times?"'".  
  6. ^ Brown, L. Carl (1984). International Politics and the Middle East: Old rules, dangerous game. Princeton University Press. p. 290.  
  7. ^ Lyons, Richard D. (25 July 1993). "Dr. Abram L. Sachar, Historian And 1st Brandeis U. President, 94".  
  8. ^ Kirsch, Jonathan (28 December 1994). "BOOK REVIEW / HISTORY: A Poignant Celebration of a Rich Vein of Jewish History: FAREWELL ESPANA: The World of the Sephardim Remembered by Howard M. Sachar, Knopf, $30, 439 pages".  
  9. ^ "Advisory Council".  
  10. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1990). The Course of Modern Jewish History. Vintage Books. pp. 891 pages.  
  11. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1961). Aliyah: The peoples of Israel. World Publishing Co. p. 475. 
  12. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1964). From the Ends of the Earth: The peoples of Israel. p. 510. 
  13. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1969). The Emergence of the Middle East: 1914–1924. Knopf. p. 518. 
  14. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1972). Europe Leaves the Middle East, 1936–1954. Knopf. p. 687.  
  15. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (2007). A History of Israel: From the rise of Zionism to our time. Knopf. p. 1270.  
  16. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1980). The Man on the Camel: A novel. Times Books. p. 308.  
  17. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1981). Egypt and Israel. R. Marek. p. 384.  
  18. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1985). Diaspora: An inquiry into the contemporary Jewish world. Harper & Row. p. 539.  
  19. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1987). A History of Israel, Volume II: From the aftermath of the Yom Kippur War. Oxford University Press.  
  20. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley; Cohen, Michael Joseph; Friedman, Isaiah; Klieman, Aaron S. (1987). The Rise of Israel: A documentary record from the nineteenth century to 1948 : a facsimile series reproducing over 1,900 documents in 39 volumes, Volume 1. Garland Pub.  
  21. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1992). A History of the Jews in America. Knopf. p. 1051.  
  22. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1995). Farewell Espana: The world of the Sephardim remembered. Vintage Books. p. 464.  
  23. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (2000). Israel and Europe: An appraisal in history. Vintage Books. p. 416.  
  24. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (2003). Dreamland: Europeans and Jews in the aftermath of the Great War. Vintage Books. p. 400.  
  25. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (2006). A History of the Jews in the Modern World. Vintage Books. p. 848.  
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.