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International Convention on Load Lines

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International Convention on Load Lines

International Convention on Load Lines is an International Convention on Load Lines (CLL), signed in London on 5 April 1966, amended by the 1988 Protocol and further revised in 2003. The 1988 Protocol was adopted to harmonise the survey and certification requirement of the 1966 Convention with those contained in the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea(SOLAS) and MARPOL 73/78.

In accordance with the International Convention on Load Lines (CLL 66/88), all assigned load lines must be marked amidships on each side of the ships engaged in international voyages. The determinations of the freeboard of ships are calculated and/or verified by classification societies which issue International Load Line Certificates in accordance with the legislation of participating States.

This Convention provides for the terms of ship's surveys, issuance, duration, validity and acceptance of International Load Line Certificates, as well as relevant State control measures, agreed exemptions and exceptions.

Annexes to the Convention contain various regulations for determining load lines, including details of marking and verification of marks, conditions of assignment of freeboard, freeboard tables and corrections, special provisions for ships intended for the carriage of timber and the prescribed form of International Load Line Certificates.

According to the Annexes to the Convention, also taken into account are the potential hazards present in different zones and different seasons and additional safety measures concerning doors, hatchways etc.

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International Convention on Load Lines
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