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Jarvis Jones

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Jarvis Jones

Jarvis Jones
Jones in his rookie season with the Steelers.
No. 95     Pittsburgh Steelers
Outside Linebacker
Personal information
Date of birth: (1989-10-13) October 13, 1989
Place of birth: Richland, Georgia
Height: 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) Weight: 245 lb (111 kg)
Career information
Columbus (GA) Carver
Georgia
NFL Draft: 2013 / Round: 1 / Pick: 17
Debuted in 2013 for the Pittsburgh Steelers
Career history
Roster status: Active
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of Week 3, 2014
Tackles 54
Sacks 4.0
Interceptions 0
Forced Fumbles 1
Stats at NFL.com

Jarvis Jerrell Jones (born October 13, 1989) nicknamed Dawg Bones, is an [2] The Pittsburgh Steelers selected him in the first round of the 2013 NFL Draft.

Early years

Jones was born in high school football team to a state title in 2007, and was rated as a four-star recruit by Rivals.com.[3] In addition to playing football, he was also an all-state basketball player.[1] He was ranked the 59th best high school prospect by ESPN.[4] He played in the 2009 U.S. Army All-American Bowl.

College career

2009 season

Jones attended University of Southern California (USC) for his freshman year, during which he saw action as a special teams and backup player for the USC Trojans Football team. In the first eight games, he recorded 13 tackles, including 1.5 tackles for loss. During the game against Oregon Jones suffered a neck injury. He was later diagnosed with spinal stenosis and the USC medical staff would not clear him to play for the team again.[5]

2010 season

When the USC medical staff would not allow Jones to practice in the spring of 2010, Jones asked for and was granted a release to transfer. His high school coach contacted Georgia, Auburn, and Florida State to discuss the possibility with the teams' coaches. After meeting with University of Georgia. He would have to redshirt during the 2010 season in compliance with NCAA transfer rules.

2011 season

Jones started every game in the 2011 season, recording a career high 4 sacks against Florida on October 29.[1] He posted 70 total tackles including 19.5 for a loss, 13.5 sacks (which led the SEC),[6] 2 forced fumbles and 26 quarterback hurries.

He was recognized as a consensus first-team All-American, having been named to the first teams of ESPN, the American Football Coaches Association, the Football Writers Association of America, and the Walter Camp Football Foundation.[7]

2012 season

In 12 games, Jones recorded 85 tackles, 24 tackles-for-loss, 14.5 sacks, 1 interception, 7 forced fumbles, and 2 fumbles recovered.[8] He missed games against Kentucky and Florida Atlantic.[9] He played an integral role in wins over Missouri and Florida.[10][11] So far Jones has been named an AFCA First Team All-American, the Southeastern Conference Defensive Player of the Year by the Associated Press and voted The 2012 Premier Player of College Football by sports fans.[12]

Professional career

Pittsburgh Steelers (2013-present)

2013: Rookie Year

On April 25, 2013, Jones was selected with the 17th overall pick by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 2013 NFL Draft.[13] He wears jersey No. 95 for the team. Throughout the early part of the season, he has been in regular rotation with Jason Worilds at right outside line backer. His first sack in the NFL was recorded on November 10, 2013 against the Buffalo Bills. During his rookie season of 2013, Jones played in 14 games making 40 tackles, 4 passes defended, and 1 sack.

2014

During his first game, against the Cleveland Browns, he matched his sack total from the year before(1).Over the first 3 games he had 14 tackles and 2 sacks. His first games made him look improved from last year, as he was more active.

During Sunday Night Football against the Carolina Panthers on September 21, 2014, Jones suffered a cluttered wrist after forcing Cam Newton to fumble and left the game. Jones underwent wrist surgery the very next day and was placed on the injured/designated for return list.

Personal

His older brother, Darcell Kitchens, was murdered outside of a bar in Richland, Georgia.[14]

Endorsements

Jones signed an endorsement deal for Subway during April 2013, just days before the 2013 draft.

References

  1. ^ a b c "Player Bio: Jarvis Jones". Georgia Athletics. Retrieved 2011-12-15. 
  2. ^ http://www.mysanantonio.com/sports/college_sports/college_football/article/Nicknames-Heisman-have-gone-hand-in-hand-4094976.php
  3. ^ https://sports.yahoo.com/ncaa/football/recruiting/player-Jarvis-Jones-51444
  4. ^ "Football Recruiting - Jarvis Jones". ESPN. Retrieved 2011-12-15. 
  5. ^ Georgia Bulldogs LB Jarvis Jones' long journey back to the field - ESPN The Magazine
  6. ^ "Top 20 college players at midseason".  
  7. ^ David Ching, Another honor for Jones and Jones, ESPN.com, December 10, 2011
  8. ^ http://www.georgiadogs.com/sports/m-footbl/stats/2012-2013/teamcume.html
  9. ^ 2012 Season statistics, University of Georgia. Last Retrieved 10-28-2012.
  10. ^ http://blogs.ajc.com/uga-sports-blog/2012/09/08/on-historic-night-in-missouri-georgias-jarvis-jones-makes-history/
  11. ^ http://onlineathens.com/sports/college-sports/2012-10-30/loran-smith-jarvis-jones-performance-against-florida-all-time-best
  12. ^ http://onlineathens.com/sports/college-sports/2012-12-03/jarvis-jones-named-ap-sec-defensive-player-year-5-other-bulldogs
  13. ^ http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap1000000163630/article/jarvis-jones-selected-by-the-steelers-at-no-17
  14. ^ Georgia Bulldogs LB Jarvis Jones overcomes family tragedy to star on field

External links

  • Career statistics and player information from NFL.com • ESPN • Pro-Football-Reference
  • Pittsburgh Steelers bio
  • Georgia Bulldogs bio
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