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Klf13

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Klf13

Kruppel-like factor 13
Identifiers
Symbols  ; BTEB3; FKLF2; NSLP1; RFLAT-1; RFLAT1
External IDs GeneCards:
RNA expression pattern
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)
RefSeq (protein)
Location (UCSC)
PubMed search

Kruppel-like factor 13, also known as KLF13, is a protein that in humans is encoded by the KLF13 gene.[1][2][3]

Function

KLF13 belongs to a family of transcription factors that contain 3 classical zinc finger DNA-binding domains consisting of a zinc atom tetrahedrally coordinated by 2 cysteines and 2 histidines (C2H2 motif). These transcription factors bind to GC-rich sequences and related GT and CACCC boxes.[1][4]

KLF13 was first described as the RANTES factor of late activated T lymphocytes (RFLAT)-1.[3] It regulates the expression of the chemokine RANTES in T lymphocytes. It functions as a lynchpin, inducing a large enhancesome. KLF13 knock-out mice show a defect in lymphocyte survival as KLF13 is a regulator of Bcl-xL expression.[3][5][6][7][8][9][10]

Interactions

KLF13 has been shown to interact with CREB-binding protein,[11] Heat shock protein 47[11] and PCAF.[11]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: KLF13 Kruppel-like factor 13". 
  2. ^ Cook T, Gebelein B, Urrutia R (June 1999). "Sp1 and its likes: biochemical and functional predictions for a growing family of zinc finger transcription factors". Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 880 (1 CELL AND MOLE): 94–102.  
  3. ^ a b c Song A, Chen YF, Thamatrakoln K, Storm TA, Krensky AM (January 1999). "RFLAT-1: a new zinc finger transcription factor that activates RANTES gene expression in T lymphocytes". Immunity 10 (1): 93–103.  
  4. ^ Scohy S, Gabant P, Van Reeth T, Hertveldt V, Drèze PL, Van Vooren P, Rivière M, Szpirer J, Szpirer C (November 2000). "Identification of KLF13 and KLF14 (SP6), novel members of the SP/XKLF transcription factor family". Genomics 70 (1): 93–101.  
  5. ^ Song A, Nikolcheva T, Krensky AM (October 2000). "Transcriptional regulation of RANTES expression in T lymphocytes". Immunol. Rev. 177 (1): 236–45.  
  6. ^ Nikolcheva T, Pyronnet S, Chou SY, Sonenberg N, Song A, Clayberger C, Krensky AM (July 2002). "A translational rheostat for RFLAT-1 regulates RANTES expression in T lymphocytes". J. Clin. Invest. 110 (1): 119–26.  
  7. ^ Song A, Patel A, Thamatrakoln K, Liu C, Feng D, Clayberger C, Krensky AM (August 2002). "Functional domains and DNA-binding sequences of RFLAT-1/KLF13, a Krüppel-like transcription factor of activated T lymphocytes". J. Biol. Chem. 277 (33): 30055–65.  
  8. ^ Zhou M, McPherson L, Feng D, Song A, Dong C, Lyu SC, Zhou L, Shi X, Ahn YT, Wang D, Clayberger C, Krensky AM (May 2007). "Kruppel-like transcription factor 13 regulates T lymphocyte survival in vivo". J. Immunol. 178 (9): 5496–504.  
  9. ^ Huang B, Ahn YT, McPherson L, Clayberger C, Krensky AM (June 2007). "Interaction of PRP4 with Kruppel-like factor 13 regulates CCL5 transcription". J. Immunol. 178 (11): 7081–7.  
  10. ^ Ahn YT, Huang B, McPherson L, Clayberger C, Krensky AM (January 2007). "Dynamic interplay of transcriptional machinery and chromatin regulates "late" expression of the chemokine RANTES in T lymphocytes". Mol. Cell. Biol. 27 (1): 253–66.  
  11. ^ a b c Song, Chao-Zhong; Keller Kimberly; Murata Ken; Asano Haruhiko; Stamatoyannopoulos George (Mar 2002). "Functional interaction between coactivators CBP/p300, PCAF, and transcription factor FKLF2". J. Biol. Chem. (United States) 277 (9): 7029–36.  

Further reading

External links

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.

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