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Kristina Groves

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Title: Kristina Groves  
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Subject: World Single Distance Championships for Women, Speed skating at the 2006 Winter Olympics – Women's team pursuit, 2008 World Single Distance Speed Skating Championships, Christine Nesbitt, Ireen Wüst
Collection: 1976 Births, Canadian Female Speed Skaters, Canadian People of Norwegian Descent, Canadian Sportswomen, Living People, Medalists at the 2006 Winter Olympics, Medalists at the 2010 Winter Olympics, Olympic Bronze Medalists for Canada, Olympic Medalists in Speed Skating, Olympic Silver Medalists for Canada, Olympic Speed Skaters of Canada, Speed Skaters at the 2002 Winter Olympics, Speed Skaters at the 2006 Winter Olympics, Speed Skaters at the 2010 Winter Olympics, Sportspeople from Ottawa, University of Calgary Alumni
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Kristina Groves

Kristina Groves
Personal information
Born (1976-12-04) December 4, 1976
Calgary, Alberta
Height 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
Weight 66 kg (146 lb; 10.4 st)
Sport
Country  Canada
Sport Speed skating

Kristina Nicole Groves (born December 4, 1976,[1] in Calgary, Alberta) is a Canadian speed skater. She is Canada's most decorated skater in the World Single Distances Championships with 13 career medals in this event.[2] She won four Olympic medals: she won two silver medals at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, in the 1,500 meters and team pursuit,[1] and she won the silver medal in the 1500 m event and the bronze medal in the 3000 m event at the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics.[1]

She is currently ranked 6th on the women's Adelskalender, her teammates Cindy Klassen and Christine Nesbitt are ranked 1st and 7th respectively.[3]

Contents

  • Career 1
  • Personal life 2
  • Personal records 3
    • World records 3.1
  • References and notes 4
  • External links 5

Career

Kristina Groves (2008)

Groves made her Olympic debut in Salt Lake City for the 2002 Winter Olympics held in the United States. She finished 20th at 1500 m, 8th at 3000 m and 10th at 5000 m.[4]

Four years later, during the 2006 Winter Olympics games held in Turin, Italy, Groves participated in five events (1000 m, 1500 m, 3000 m, 5000 m, team pursuit). She finished 5th at 1000 m, 2nd at the 1500 m, 8th at the 3000 m, 6th at the 5000 m, and 2nd in the team pursuit with the Canadian team.

She was the 2008 Single Distances World Champion on the 3000-m. She won a medal in every event that she skated at these championships, as she also won an additional 2 silver medals and 2 bronze medals.

During the 2008–2009 world cup season, Groves won 12 medals including four gold. During the 2009 World Single Distances Championships held at the new Richmond Olympic Oval, near Vancouver, Canada, her career took an amazing turn when Groves became the most decorated speed skating athlete in the country at this event, surpassing the well-known Jeremy Wotherspoon with 13 medals, compared to his 10. She is also the world cup winner for a second year in a row at 1500 m event.

During the Calgary Essent ISU Worldcup held at the Olympic Oval, Groves set a world record on December 6, 2009, at the team pursuit with teammates Christine Nesbitt and Brittany Schussler with a time of two minutes 55.79 seconds.[5]

Groves qualified for 5 events for the 2010 Winter Olympics games held in Vancouver and participated in the 1000 m, 1500 m, 3000 m, 5000 m and team pursuit, more than any other athletes on the Canadian speed skating team.[6] In her first event at the Olympics, the 3000 metres, she won a bronze medal.[7] On February 18 she finished fourth in the 1000 metres, .06 seconds behind the bronze medal winner. Her teammate Christine Nesbitt won the gold medal.[8] On February 21, she won a silver medal in the 1500 metres.[9] She became the 11th Canadian to win at least four medals at the Olympics (Summer or Winter).[10]

Personal life

Groves majored in kinesiology and graduated from the University of Calgary in 2004.[11] In early years, she went to Fielding Drive Public School and Brookfield High School in Ottawa.

Personal records

Groves' current Adelskalender score is 157.616, which places 6th of all time.[3]

500 m 38.75
1000 m 1:14.51
1500 m 1:53.18
3000 m 3:58.11
5000 m 6:54.54

Source: SpeedskatingResults.com.[12]

World records

Event Time Date Venue
Team pursuit 3:05.49 November 12, 2004 Hamar
Team pursuit 3:03.07 November 20, 2004 Berlijn
Team pursuit 2:55.79 December 6, 2009 Calgary

Source: SpeedSkatingStats.com.[1]

References and notes

  1. ^ a b c d "Kristina Groves". SpeedSkatingStats.com. Retrieved September 12, 2012. 
  2. ^ http://vancouver.sportingnews.com/wolympics/athlete.asp?type=&country=CAN&page=SS&id=530688
  3. ^ a b "Adelskalender: Small combination Women". SpeedSkatingStats.com. Retrieved September 12, 2012. 
  4. ^ http://www.ctvolympics.ca/team-canada/athletes/athlete=3266/results/index.html
  5. ^ http://www.ctvolympics.ca/worldcupwatch/sport=ss/newsid=21658.html#canada+sets+world+record+speed+skating+pursuit
  6. ^ http://www.ctvolympics.ca/news-centre/newsid=24494.html#groves+raises+vancouver
  7. ^ Starkman, Randy (2010-02-15). "Crowd spurs Kristina Groves to bronze".  
  8. ^ Traikos, Michael (2010-02-19). "Groves pleased with fourth despite missing podium by a fraction of a second".  
  9. ^ Friesen, Paul (2010-02-21). "Canada's Groves takes silver in women's 1,500".  
  10. ^ "Most Canadian Olympic medals".  
  11. ^ http://www.ucalgary.ca/news/uofcpublications/oncampus/online/june14-07/groves
  12. ^ "Kristina Groves". SpeedskatingResults.com. Retrieved September 12, 2012. 

External links

  • SpeedSkatingBase.eu PB's and link to results Kristina Groves
  • Results and records of Kristina Groves at SpeedSkatingStats.com
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