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Kvitfjell

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Title: Kvitfjell  
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Kvitfjell

Kvitfjell
Location Ringebu, Oppland,
 Norway
Nearest city Lillehammer: 55 km (34 mi)
Coordinates
Vertical    854 m (2,802 ft)
Top elevation 1,039 m (3,409 ft)
Base elevation    185 m (607 ft)
Runs 23 pistes
- 5 nursery
- 9 beginner
- 6 intermediate
- 3 advanced
Longest run 3.5 km (2.2 mi)
Lift system 9 total
- 3 chairlifts
- 2 T-bars
- 3 telescopic lifts
- 1 belt lift
Lift capacity 11,300 / hr
Terrain parks 1
Snowfall low
Snowmaking 80% of pistes[1]
Night skiing Tue, Thu (Dec), & Fri
until 8 pm, 2.6 km (1.6 mi)
Website Kvitfjell.no
Kvitfjell is located in Norway
Kvitfjell
Kvitfjell
location of Kvitfjell in Norway

Kvitfjell (Norwegian: White mountain) is a ski resort in Norway, located in the municipality of Ringebu.

Developed for the 1994 Winter Olympics in Lillehammer, it is one of the most modern resorts in the world, with snowmaking on 80% of the alpine pistes. Based near the river Gudbrandsdalslågen, the resort offers 23 pistes: 5 green (nursery), 9 blue (beginner), 6 red (intermediate), and 3 black (advanced).[2] Kvitfjell is also home to a terrain park and 120 km (75 mi) of cross-country pistes, with access to 480 km (300 mi) extra in Skei and Gålå.

1994 Winter Olympics

Kvitfjell is probably best known for hosting the men's and women's alpine speed events at the 1994 Winter Olympics.[3] Tommy Moe, an American of Norwegian descent, edged out home favorite Kjetil André Aamodt of Norway by 0.04 seconds in the downhill,[4][5] then was edged out by Markus Wasmeier of Germany by 0.08 seconds in the Super G.

Katja Seizinger of Germany won the women's downhill with Picabo Street of the U.S. a distant second; Diann Roffe of the U.S. took gold in the Super G. The technical alpine events (giant slalom and slalom) were held at Hafjell.

World Cup

Kvitfjell is a regular stop on the World Cup circuit, hosting men's speed events in early March. The downhill course begins just below the summit and is slightly over 3 km (1.9 mi) in length.[6] Designed by Bernhard Russi for the 1994 Olympics, the challenging Olympiabakken course is well regarded; after the Olympics, men's World Cup races have been held here every year since,[7][8] and are scheduled for Kvitfjell for March 2014.

References

  1. ^ Kvitfjell.no - facts - accessed 2010-02-22
  2. ^ www.kvitfjell.no brochure
  3. ^ 1994 Winter Olympics official report. Volume 3. pp. 47-50.
  4. ^ "Americans just say Moe". Spokesman-Review. Associated Press. February 14, 1994. p. C1. 
  5. ^ Johnson, William Oscar (February 21, 1994). "The Son Finally Rises". Sports Illustrated: 20. 
  6. ^ "Kvitfjell: World Cup downhill results". FIS. March 3, 2012. 
  7. ^ FIS-ski.com - Kvitfjell - podiums
  8. ^ FIS-ski.com - Lillehammer - podiums

External links

  • Kvitfjell official website (English)
  • Piste Maps - Kvitfjell
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