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Kyle Brotzman

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Kyle Brotzman

Kyle Brotzman
Boise State kicker Kyle Brotzman in a game vs San Jose State on October 31, 2009 in Boise, ID
No. 0, 12
Position: Placekicker
Personal information
Date of birth: (1986-10-03) October 3, 1986
Place of birth: Meridian, Idaho
Height: 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
Weight: 190 lb (86 kg)
Career information
High school: Meridian (ID)
College: Boise State
Undrafted: 2011
Career history
Career Arena football statistics
Field Goals Made: 3
Field Goals Attempted: 7
Extra Points Made: 232
Extra Points Attempted: 276
Tackles: 12
Stats at ArenaFan.com

Kyle Brotzman (born October 3, 1986) is a former American football placekicker. He was a member of the Utah Blaze of the Arena Football League.

College career

He played for the Boise State Broncos. A former walk-on, he became the Broncos' starting kicker and punter.[1]

He garnered second-team All-WAC honors in 2007 and was Boise State's co-Special Teams Player of the Year in 2008. In the 2010 Fiesta Bowl, Brotzman threw a fourth-down pass out of punt formation that led to the Broncos' winning touchdown.[2]

Brotzman[3] gained national media attention when he missed two late-game field goals in the November 26, 2010 game versus the Nevada Wolf Pack. The first one, a 26-yarder at the end of regulation, would have sealed a victory for the Broncos as time ran out.[4] The second failed attempt would have put the Broncos ahead in overtime, and was a 29-yard try. Nevada went on to win the game 34-31, dealing Boise State its first defeat of the 2010 season.[5] Boise State coach Chris Petersen refused to directly blame the loss on Brotzman, stating that "one play can win a game but one play can't lose it. There's a lot of plays to be made that we didn't make for whatever reason."[6] Meanwhile, Nevada's coach characterized his win as the greatest in the program's history.[7] After the game, over 45,000 Broncos fans showed their support for Brotzman on Facebook.[8] However, he was also the recipient of death threats and hate-mail from angered Boise State fans.[9] He graduated with the record for the most points in NCAA history by a Division I kicker.*

Professional career

On June 15, 2011, he signed with the Utah Blaze of the Arena Football League. He debuted in Utah Blaze's 81-40 victory over the Pittsburgh Power

References

  1. ^ Kicking the habit: Boise State kicker Brotzman bears down to limit left-hash woes | BSU Player Profiles | Idaho Statesman
  2. ^ http://www.broncosports.com/ViewArticle.dbml?SPSID=48552&SPID=4061&DB_LANG=C&DB_OEM_ID=9900&ATCLID=520496&Q_SEASON=2010
  3. ^ Nevada Stuns No. 3 Boise State 34-31 In Overtime : NPR
  4. ^ Blame Brotzman, no: Blame the Broncos | Arbiter Online
  5. ^ Boise State shocked on dramatic day by Nevada - latimes.com
  6. ^ Boise-Nevada game proves fine line between choke and clutch - NCAA Football - CBSSports.com
  7. ^ http://www.usatoday.com/sports/college/football/wac/2010-11-27-boise-state-nevada_N.htm?csp=hf
  8. ^ http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-11-28/boise-st-fans-support-kicker-with-facebook-page.html
  9. ^ http://arbiteronline.com/2010/12/02/leave-brotzman-alone-missed-kick-doesnt-warrant-death-threats/

External links

  • Boise State Bio
  • Utah Blaze Bio
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