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Light Green SF yellowish

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Title: Light Green SF yellowish  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Masson's trichrome stain, Feulgen stain, Fast Green FCF, Triarylmethane dyes, Papanicolaou stain
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Light Green SF yellowish

Light Green SF yellowish
Names
IUPAC name
ethyl-[4-[[4-[ethyl-[(3-sulfophenyl)methyl]amino]phenyl]-(4-sulfophenyl)methylene]-1-cyclohexa-2,5-dienylidene]-[(3-sulfophenyl)methyl]ammonium
Identifiers
 Y
ChemSpider  Y
Jmol-3D images Image
KEGG  N
PubChem
Properties
C37H37N2O9S3+
Molar mass 749.893 g/mol
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
 N  (: Y/N?)

Light Green SF yellowish, or Light Green, Acid Green, Lissamine green SF, Acid Green 5, Food Green 2, FD&C Green no. 2, Green No. 205, Acid Brilliant Green 5, Pencil Green SF, or C.I. 42095, is a green triarylmethane dye. It is used in histology for staining collagen; for that purpose it is a standard dye in North America. In Masson's trichrome it is used as a counterstain to acid fuchsin. It is a critical component of Papanicolaou stains together with eosin Y and bismarck brown Y. It usually comes as a disodium salt. Its maximum absorption is at 630 (422) nm.

The dye is not very durable — it has a tendency to fade. When fading is to be avoided, it is replaced with Fast Green FCF, which also has more brilliant color. Fast Green FCF can also substitute Light Green SF yellowish in many other procedures.

Lissamine green dye can be used to check the health of the anterior surfaces of the eye. It is available on a steret. The steret is wet with saline and then the dye is dropped into the lower fornix. The dye shows up conjunctival staining similar to rose Bengal dye but it does not sting like rose Bengal does.

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