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List of individual weapons of the U.S. Armed Forces

This is a list of United States Army and the U.S. Marine Corps, these two classes of weapons are understood to be crew-served, as the operator of the weapon (identified as a sniper or as a SAW gunner) has an assistant who carries additional ammunition and associated equipment, acts as a spotter, and is also fully qualified in the operation of the weapon. These weapons are listed under the List of crew-served weapons of the U.S. armed forces.

Contents

  • Bayonets, knives, bayonet-knife models 1
    • In active service (some branches or limited roles) 1.1
    • Out of service (obsolete) 1.2
  • Grenades 2
    • In active service 2.1
    • In active service (some branches or limited roles) 2.2
    • Out of service (obsolete) 2.3
  • Handguns 3
    • In active service 3.1
    • In active service (some branches or limited roles) 3.2
    • Out of service (obsolete)/Cancelled experiments 3.3
    • Experimental 3.4
  • Less-lethal 4
    • In active service (some branches or limited roles) 4.1
    • Out of service (obsolete) 4.2
  • Rifles 5
    • In active service 5.1
    • In active service (some branches or limited roles) 5.2
    • Out of service (obsolete)/Canceled experiments 5.3
    • Experimental 5.4
  • Carbines 6
    • In active service 6.1
    • In active service (some branches or limited roles) 6.2
    • Out of service (obsolete) including canceled experiments 6.3
  • Shotguns 7
    • In active service 7.1
    • In active service (some branches or limited roles) 7.2
    • Out of service/Canceled 7.3
    • Experimental 7.4
  • Submachine guns 8
    • In active service (some branches or limited roles) 8.1
    • Out of service (obsolete) 8.2
  • Anti-tank/assault 9
    • In active service 9.1
    • In active service (some branches or limited roles) 9.2
    • Out of service (obsolete) 9.3
    • Experimental 9.4
  • Mines 10
    • In active service 10.1
  • Swords 11
    • In active service 11.1
    • Out of service 11.2
  • See also 12
  • References 13

Bayonets, knives, bayonet-knife models

In active service (some branches or limited roles)

Out of service (obsolete)

Grenades

In active service

In active service (some branches or limited roles)

Out of service (obsolete)

Handguns

The M1911A1 and M9 pistol.

In active service

  • M9 (9×19mm)
  • M11 (9×19mm)

In active service (some branches or limited roles)

Out of service (obsolete)/Cancelled experiments

Experimental

Less-lethal

In active service (some branches or limited roles)

Out of service (obsolete)

Rifles

Includes muskets, musketoons, etc., as well as rifles

Weapons from Vietnam and Desert Storm at the National Firearms Museum.[14]

In active service

  • M16A4 (5.56×45mm NATO)

In active service (some branches or limited roles)

Out of service (obsolete)/Canceled experiments

Experimental

Carbines

In active service

  • M4 (5.56×45mm NATO)

In active service (some branches or limited roles)

Out of service (obsolete) including canceled experiments

Shotguns

In active service

  • M500 (pump-action 12 Gauge)
  • M590 (pump-action 12 Gauge)
  • M590A1 (pump-action 12 Gauge)

In active service (some branches or limited roles)

Out of service/Canceled

Experimental

Submachine guns

In active service (some branches or limited roles)

Out of service (obsolete)

Anti-tank/assault

In active service

In active service (some branches or limited roles)

Out of service (obsolete)

Experimental

Mines

In active service

Swords

Five U.S. Marine Corps privates with fixed bayonets under the command of their noncommissioned officer, who displays his M1859 Marine NCO sword.

In active service

Out of service

  • Model 1832 Foot Artillery Sword
  • Model 1840 Light Artillery Saber
  • Model 1872 Mounted Artillery Officers' Saber
  • Model 1840 Army Musicians' Sword
  • Model 1812/13 Starr Cavalry Saber
  • Model 1818 Starr Cavalry Saber
  • Model 1833 Dragoon Saber
  • Model 1840 Heavy Cavalry Saber
  • Model 1860 Light Cavalry Saber
  • Model 1872 Light Cavalry Saber
  • Model 1906 Light Cavalry Saber
  • Model 1913 "Patton" Cavalry Saber
  • Model 1832 Army Foot Officers' Sword
  • Model 1832 Army General & Staff Officers' Sword
  • Model 1832 Army Medical Staff Officers' Sword
  • Model 1839 Army Topographical Engineer Officers' Sword
  • Model 1840 Army Foot Officers' Sword
  • Model 1840 Army General & Staff Officers' Sword
  • Model 1840 Army Medical Staff Officers' Sword
  • Model 1840 Army Pay Department Officers' Sword
  • Model 1840 Army Engineer Officers' Sword
  • Model 1850 Army Foot Officers' Sword
  • Model 1850 Army Staff & Field Officers' Sword
  • Model 1860 Army Field & Staff Officers' Sword
  • Model 1872 Army Line & Staff Officers' Sword
  • Model 1830 Navy Officers' Sword
  • Model 1841 Navy Officers' Sword
  • Model 1834 Revenue Cutter Service Officers' Sword
  • Model 1870 Revenue Cutter Service Officers' Sword
  • Model 1797 Starr Naval Cutlass
  • Model 1808 Starr Naval Cutlass
  • Mayweg & Nippes "Baltimore" Naval Cutlass, c. 1810
  • Model 1816 Starr Naval Cutlass
  • Model 1826 Starr Naval Cutlass
  • Model 1841 Naval Cutlass
  • Model 1861 Naval Cutlass
  • Model 1917 Naval Cutlass
  • Marine Noncommissioned Officers' Sword, c.1832–1859
  • Marine Officers' Mameluke Sword, 1826–59
  • West Point Cadets' Sword, Model 1872
  • West Point Cadets' Sword, c. 1837

See also

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^ a b
  5. ^
  6. ^
  7. ^
  8. ^
  9. ^
  10. ^
  11. ^ Army Testing Stackable Grenades for Infantry - Kitup.Military.com, 20 February 2015
  12. ^ Mid-size Riot Control Disperser (MRCD), XM37
  13. ^ SOLICITATION/CONTRACT/ORDER FOR COMMERCIAL ITEMS
  14. ^ National Firearms Museum: Ever Vigilant Gallery, Case 67 description
  15. ^ Canfield, Bruce N. American Rifleman (April 2009) p.40
  16. ^ Canfield, Bruce N. American Rifleman (July 2008) pp.51-73
  17. ^ Canfield, Bruce N. American Rifleman (April 2009) pp.56-76
  18. ^ US Air Force Material Command. Air Force Instruction 36-2226, Combat Arms Program, Supplement 1. Wright-Patterson AFB: US Air Force Material Command, 2004.
  19. ^
  20. ^
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