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List of solar eclipses seen from China

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Title: List of solar eclipses seen from China  
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Subject: Lists of solar eclipses, List of solar eclipses in the 13th century BC, List of solar eclipses in the 12th century BC, List of solar eclipses in the 12th century, List of solar eclipses in the 10th century
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List of solar eclipses seen from China

Lists of solar eclipses
Diagram of a solar eclipse (not to scale)
Geometry of a total solar eclipse
(not to scale)
Centuries

AD
1st · 2nd · 3rd · 4th · 5th · 6th · 7th · 8th · 9th · 10th · 11th · 12th · 13th · 14th · 15th · 16th · 17th · 18th · 19th · 20th · 21st · 22nd · 23rd · 24th · 25th · 26th · 27th · 28th · 29th · 30th
Eclipses seen from
China · Philippines  · United Kingdom  · United States
See also List of lunar eclipses

This list of solar eclipses seen from China describes precise visibility information for solar eclipses and major cities in China.

A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby obscuring Earth's view of the Sun. Eclipses can be total, annular, or partial. The zone of a total eclipse where the sky appears dark is often just a few miles wide. This is known as the path of totality.

An eclipse that is "visible from Asia" in general terms might not be visible at all at a specific location. E.g., parts of Sri Lanka may fall into darkness for a few seconds, people in Indonesia, India, and Pakistan enjoy the partial eclipse, and Beijing may be too far away to fall under the moon's shadow.

Occasionally a major city lies in the direct path of an annular or total eclipse, which is of great interest to astronomy buffs – some people make travel arrangements years in advance to observe eclipses. Nearly two-thirds of the Earth's surface is covered by oceans, thus a total eclipse at a major metropolitan area where hotels and amenities are available is an event of considerable interest.

List of the previous and the next total and annular solar eclipses

Name Geographical coordinate Total Annular
Prev Next Prev Next
Beijing 1277 Oct 28 2035 Sep 02 1802 Aug 28 2118 Mar 22
Shanghai 2009 Jul 22 2309 Jun 09 1987 Sep 23 2312 Apr 07
Tianjin 1277 Oct 28 2187 Jul 06 1802 Aug 28 2118 Mar 22
Chongqing 2009 Jul 22 2241 Aug 08 2010 Jan 15 2429 Jul 02
Hong Kong 1814 Jul 17 2881 Mar 21 1958 Apr 19* 2012 May 21
Macau 1814 Jul 17* 2881 Mar 21 1785 Aug 05* 2012 May 21

 * Not part of China

List of total and annular solar eclipses occurs between 1001 and 3000

Beijing ()

Shanghai ()

Tianjin ()

Chongqing ()

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