Lord chief baron of the exchequer

For the Chief Baron of the Exchequer in Ireland, see Chief Baron of the Exchequer (Ireland).

The Chief Baron of the Exchequer was the first "baron" (i.e., judge) of the English Exchequer of pleas. "In the absence of both the Treasurer of the Exchequer or First Lord of the Treasury, and the Chancellor of the Exchequer, it was he who presided in the equity court and answered the bar i.e. spoke for the court."[1] Practically speaking, he held the most important office of the Exchequer of Pleas.

The chief baron along with the three puisne barons, sat as a court of common law, heard suits in the court of equity, and settled revenue disputes. A puisne baron was styled "Mr Baron X" and the chief baron as "Lord Chief Baron X".

From 1550 to 1579, there was a major distinction between the chief baron and the second, third and fourth puisne barons. The difference was in social status and education. All of the chief barons had been trained as lawyers in the inns of court. With the exception of Henry Bradshaw and Sir Clement Higham, both barristers-at-law, all of the chief barons who served Queen Elizabeth I, had attained the highest and most prestigious rank of a lawyer, serjeant-at-law.

In 1875, the Court of Exchequer became the Exchequer Division of the High Court. Following the death of the last chief baron, the division and that of Common Pleas were merged into the Queen's Bench Division.[2]

Chief Barons of the Exchequer

See also

References


Further reading

  • Walker, David M., The Oxford Companion to Law, Appendix I, list of Chief Barons 1660-1880
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