World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

MYB (gene)

Article Id: WHEBN0014129951
Reproduction Date:

Title: MYB (gene)  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: ETS2, Maize, Kenneth Kaushansky, Transcription factors, NeuroD
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

MYB (gene)

V-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog

PDB rendering based on 1guu.
Available structures
PDB Ortholog search: PDBe, RCSB
Identifiers
Symbols  ; Cmyb; c-myb; c-myb_CDS; efg
External IDs GeneCards:
RNA expression pattern
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)
RefSeq (protein)
Location (UCSC)
PubMed search

Myb proto-oncogene protein also known as transcriptional activator Myb is a protein that in humans is encoded by the MYB gene.[1][2]

Function

Myb proto-oncogene protein is a member of the MYB (myeloblastosis) family of transcription factors. The protein contains three domains, an N-terminal DNA-binding domain, a central transcriptional activation domain and a C-terminal domain involved in transcriptional repression. This protein plays an essential role in the regulation of hematopoiesis and may play a role in tumorigenesis, including the regulation of miR-155 in B-cells.[3]

Plant orthologs

MYB factors represent a family of proteins that include the conserved MYB DNA-binding domain. Plants contain a MYB-protein subfamily that is characterised by the R2R3-type MYB domain.[4]

In maize, phlobaphenes are synthesized in the flavonoids synthetic pathway[5] from polymerisation of flavan-4-ols[6][7] which encodes an R2R3 myb-like transcriptional activator[8] of the A1 gene encoding for the dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (reducing dihydroflavonols into flavan-4-ols)[9] while another gene (Suppressor of Pericarp Pigmentation 1 or SPP1) acts as a suppressor.[10] The maize P gene encodes a Myb homolog that recognizes the sequence CCT/AACC, in sharp contrast with the C/TAACGG bound by vertebrate Myb proteins.[11]

In sorghum, the corresponding yellow seed 1 gene (y1)[12] also encodes a R2R3 type of Myb domain protein that regulates the expression of chalcone synthase, chalcone isomerase and dihydroflavonol reductase genes required for the biosynthesis of 3-deoxyflavonoids.[13]

Ruby is a MYB transcriptional activator of genes that produce anthocyanin in citrus fruits. In most citrus varieties Ruby is non-functional, but in blood oranges it upregulates anthocyanin production to produce the characteristic red color of the fruit. [14]

References

  1. ^ Chen Y, Xu H, Liu J, Zhang C, Leutz A, Mo X (Jul 2007). "The c-Myb functions as a downstream target of PDGF-mediated survival signal in vascular smooth muscle cells". Biochem Biophys Res Commun 360 (2): 433–6.  
  2. ^ "Entrez Gene: v-myb myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog (avian)". 
  3. ^ Vargova K, Curik N, Burda P, Basova P, Kulvait V, Pospisil V, Savvulidi F, Kokavec J, Necas E, Berkova A, Obrtlikova P, Karban J, Mraz M, Pospisilova S, Mayer J, Trneny M, Zavadil J, Stopka T (April 2011). "MYB transcriptionally regulates the miR-155 host gene in chronic lymphocytic leukemia". Blood 117 (14): 3816–25.  
  4. ^ Stracke R, Werber M, Weisshaar B (October 2001). "The R2R3-MYB gene family in Arabidopsis thaliana". Curr. Opin. Plant Biol. 4 (5): 447–56.  
  5. ^ Himi E, Mares DJ, Yanagisawa A, Noda K (July 2002). "Effect of grain colour gene (R) on grain dormancy and sensitivity of the embryo to abscisic acid (ABA) in wheat". J. Exp. Bot. 53 (374): 1569–74.  
  6. ^ Winkel-Shirley B (June 2001). "Flavonoid biosynthesis. A colorful model for genetics, biochemistry, cell biology, and biotechnology". Plant Physiol. 126 (2): 485–93.  
  7. ^ Chopra S, Cocciolone SM, Bushman S, Sangar V, McMullen MD, Peterson T (March 2003). "The maize unstable factor for orange1 is a dominant epigenetic modifier of a tissue specifically silent allele of pericarp color1". Genetics 163 (3): 1135–46.  
  8. ^ Structural And Transcriptional Analysis Of The Complex P1-wr Cluster In Maize. Wolfgang Goettel, Joachim Messing. Plant & Animal Genomes XVI Conference
  9. ^ Dong X, Braun EL, Grotewold E (September 2001). "Functional conservation of plant secondary metabolic enzymes revealed by complementation of Arabidopsis flavonoid mutants with maize genes". Plant Physiol. 127 (1): 46–57.  
  10. ^ Lee EA, Harper V (2002). "Suppressor of Pericarp Pigmentation 1 (SPP1), a novel gene involved in phlobaphene accumulation in maize (Zea mays L.) pericarps.". Maydica 47 (1): 51–58.  INIST:13772300
  11. ^ The myb-homologous P gene controls phlobaphene pigmentation in maize floral organs by directly activating a flavonoid biosynthetic gene subset. Erich Grotewold, Bruce J. Drummond, Ben Bowen and Thomas Peterson, Cell, 11 February 199, Volume 76, Issue 3, pages 543-554, doi:10.1016/0092-8674(94)90117-1 PMID 8313474
  12. ^ Boddu J, Svabek C, Ibraheem F, Jones AD, Chopra S (2005). "Characterization of a deletion allele of a sorghum Myb gene yellow seedl showing loss of 3-deoxyflavonoids". Plant Science 169 (3): 542–552.   INIST:16983977
  13. ^ Boddu J, Jiang C, Sangar V, Olson T, Peterson T, Chopra S (January 2006). "Comparative structural and functional characterization of sorghum and maize duplications containing orthologous myb transcription regulators of 3-deoxyflavonoid biosynthesis". Plant Mol. Biol. 60 (2): 185–99.  
  14. ^ Butelli E, Licciardello C, Zhang Y, Liu J, Mackay S, Bailey P, Reforgiato-Recupero G, Martin C (2012). "Retrotransposons control fruit-specific, cold-dependent accumulation of anthocyanins in blood oranges". Plant Cell 24 (3): 1242–55.  

Further reading

External links

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.