World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Macaque

Article Id: WHEBN0000239860
Reproduction Date:

Title: Macaque  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Formosan rock macaque, Celebes crested macaque, Old World monkey, Arunachal macaque, Barbary macaque
Collection: Cercopithecine Monkeys, Mammals of Malaysia, Tool-Using Mammals
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Macaque

Macaques[1]
Bonnet macaque
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Primates
Family: Cercopithecidae
Subfamily: Cercopithecinae
Tribe: Papionini
Genus: Macaca
Lacépède, 1799
Type species
Simia inuus
Linnaeus, 1766
Species

See text

The macaques ( or [2]) constitute a genus (Macaca) of Old World monkeys of the subfamily Cercopithecinae. The 23 species of macaques are widespread over Earth.

Contents

  • Description 1
  • Social behavior 2
  • Relation with humans 3
  • Species 4
  • Gallery 5
  • See also 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

Description

Aside from humans (genus Homo), the macaques are monkeys that are the most widespread primate genus, ranging from Japan to Afghanistan and, in the case of the barbary macaque (Macaca sylvanus), to North Africa and Southern Europe. Twenty-three macaque species are currently recognized, including some of the monkeys best known to non-zoologists, such as the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), and the barbary macaque, a colony of which lives on the Rock of Gibraltar. Although several species lack tails and their common names therefore refer to them as apes, these are true monkeys, with no greater relationship to the true apes than any other Old World monkeys.

In some species, skin folds join the second through fifth toes, almost reaching the first metatarsal joint.[3]

Social behavior

The premotor cortex of macaques is widely studied.[4]

Macaques have a very intricate social structure and hierarchy. If a macaque of a lower level in the social chain has eaten berries and none are left for a higher-level macaque, then the one higher in status can, within this social organization, remove the berries from the other monkey's mouth.[5]

Relation with humans

Several species of macaques are used extensively in animal testing, particularly in the neuroscience of visual perception and the visual system.

Nearly all (73–100%) pet and captive macaques are carriers of the herpes B virus. This virus is harmless to macaques, but infections of humans, while rare, are potentially fatal, a risk that makes macaques unsuitable as pets.[6]

A 2005 University of Toronto study showed urban performing macaques also carried simian foamy virus, suggesting they could be involved in the species-to-species jump of similar retroviruses to humans.[7]

Vietnamese engage in the hunting and killing of the Macaque.[8][9]

Species

Genus Macaca

Prehistoric (fossil) species:

Gallery

See also

References

  1. ^
  2. ^ macaque pronunciation by Oxford Dictionaries
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^ "The Life of Mammals" Hosted by David Attenborough, 2003 British Broadcasting Corporation. BBC Video
  6. ^
  7. ^ University of Toronto - News@UofT - Performing monkeys in Asia carry viruses that could jump species to humans (Dec 8/05)
  8. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DddqzbLglyU
  9. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bmc8S0o7HsY
  10. ^
  11. ^

External links

  • Macaque Monkey Brain Atlas
  • FactsheetsMacacaPrimate Info Net
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.