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Manuel Amoros

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Title: Manuel Amoros  
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Subject: Michel Platini, Maxime Bossis, Luis Fernández, France national football team, 1982 FIFA World Cup
Collection: 1962 Births, 1982 Fifa World Cup Players, 1986 Fifa World Cup Players, As Monaco Fc Players, Association Football Defenders, Benin National Football Team Managers, Comoros National Football Team Managers, Expatriate Football Managers in Benin, Expatriate Football Managers in the Comoros, France International Footballers, French Footballers, French People of Spanish Descent, Ligue 1 Players, Living People, Olympique De Marseille Players, Olympique Lyonnais Players, People from Nîmes, Uefa Euro 1984 Players, Uefa Euro 1992 Players, Uefa European Championship-Winning Players
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Manuel Amoros

Manuel Amoros
Personal information
Full name Manuel Amoros
Date of birth (1962-02-01) 1 February 1962
Place of birth Nîmes, France
Height 1.72 m (5 ft 7 12 in)
Playing position Right back
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1979–1980 Monaco B 17 (3)
1980–1989 Monaco 287 (36)
1989–1993 Marseille 108 (2)
1993–1995 Lyon 66 (3)
1995–1996 Marseille 16 (0)
Total 494 (44)
National team
1982–1992 France 82 (1)
Teams managed
2010 Comoros
2012–2014 Benin

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

† Appearances (goals)

Manuel Amoros (born 1 February 1962 in Nîmes) is a French retired football defender of Spanish descent. He was capped 82 times for France,[1] and played in the European Championships finals of 1984 and 1992, and the World Cup finals in 1982 and 1986.

Contents

  • Playing career 1
    • Club career 1.1
    • International career 1.2
  • Managerial career 2
    • Comoros 2.1
  • Honours 3
    • Club 3.1
    • National Team 3.2
    • Individual 3.3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Playing career

Club career

Amoros played most of his career for Monaco in the French first division. He missed his penalty in the 1991 European Cup Final for Marseille and subsequently Red Star Belgrade won the match 5–3 on penalties.

International career

It was his stints with the Tricolor during the 1982 and 1986 World Cups in which he stood out. In the 1982 semi-final against West Germany, he hit the crossbar in the 89th minute, and in the penalty shoot-out he converted his kick before France were eventually eliminated.

In the 1984 European Championships held in France, Amoros showed an egregious side of him when, during the opening game against Denmark, he was sent off for head-butting the Danish midfielder Jesper Olsen. He was banned for three games. However, in the final against Spain, national coach Michel Hidalgo used him as a substitute in a game that Les Bleus won by 2–0 at the Parc des Princes.

At the 1986 World Cup, the 24-year-old Amoros was voted best right-back in the tournament by the international press.

Managerial career

Comoros

In June 2010, Amoros was appointed national team manager for the Comoros Islands, [2] which coached to September 2010. In January 2012, he was named new coach of Benin, replacing Edme Codjo, who had been in charge since August 2011. [3]

Honours

Club

Monaco
Marseille

National Team

France

Individual

References

  1. ^ http://www.fff.fr/equipes-de-france/tous-les-joueurs/fiche-joueur/82-manuel-amoros
  2. ^ http://www.om.net/en/Saison/101005/Actualites/47320/Manuel_Amoros_Comoros_Islands_national_team_manager
  3. ^ http://www.fifa.com/worldfootball/news/newsid=1567796.html
  4. ^ FIFA XI´s Matches - Full Info

External links

  • Manuel Amoros at National-Football-Teams.com
  • Profile at Soccerway.com
  • Profile at Soccerpunter.com
  • Profile at Footballdatabase.eu
  • Manuel Amoros manager stats at footballzz.co.uk
  • Profile at Worldfootball.net
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Luis Fernandez
France national football team captain
1988-1992
Succeeded by
Jean Pierre Papin


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