World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

MegaGlest

Article Id: WHEBN0033704625
Reproduction Date:

Title: MegaGlest  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: List of OpenGL programs, AstroMenace, Slingshot (video game), Tux Typing, Danger from the Deep
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

MegaGlest

MegaGlest

In-game screenshot


Developer(s) MegaGlest Team
Engine MegaGlest Engine
Platform(s) Linux, FreeBSD, Windows, OS X (Cross-platform)
Release date(s)
  • WW January 6, 2010 (2010-01-06)

  • WW January 20, 2014 (2014-01-20)
(stable version 3.9.1)
Genre(s) Real-time strategy
Mode(s) Single player, Multiplayer
Distribution Download, physical media
Indian faction, desert tileset
Romans and Norseman factions in a fight
Villages of Persians and Indians

MegaGlest is a free and open source real-time strategy computer game in a fantasy world, mixing elements of re-imagined past civilizations, magic and steam punk.

Gameplay

MegaGlest is set in a fantasy world with seven factions: Magic, Tech, Indians, Egypt, Norsemen, Persian and Romans, which together form the Megapack.[1] Each come with their own set of units, buildings and upgrades, advantages and disadvantages, which allows for variation in strategy while keeping a balanced gameplay. For example, the Tech faction uses traditional human warriors and has medieval mechanical devices in its arsenal, and are strong in melee combat while the Magic faction is designed for more advanced players with most of their units morphed from or summoned by others. Magic lacks the hand-to-hand combat strength of the Tech faction but features more versatile units. Tilesets are selected at the new game setup menu and determine the graphical nature of the MegaGlest game world. MegaGlest provides cross-platform online multiplayer LAN/Internet support.

Because of the moddability of the engine, MegaGlest can play games from a variety of player-created mods and total conversions, spanning very different themes. The Japanese[2] mod is an artistic mod with units and buildings inspired by historic Japanese warfare. Prax is another fantasy-themed tech tree which bears some similarities to MegaGlest's Magic and Tech factions but improves upon them, bearing both units and structures with very different properties and making use of newer engine features. The Military Glest and Enemies and Allies[3] mods have a contemporary warfare theme and the Vbros Mods[4] have a variety of factions; British, Western, Pirates, Canadians, Crusaders, Dark Knights, USA, Moon, Chess, Penguins, and much more.

Game Engine

While the term MegaGlest is usually used to refer to the complete game, the game engine, referred to as MegaGlest Engine, may also be used to create separate games. At this time, there is one released game which is built on the MegaGlest Engine: Annex - Conquer the World,[5] another free and open source real-time strategy game, has a futuristic scenery with Manga elements, vehicle and hero units, and is therefore quite different from MegaGlest. Two more games are under development, planning to combine the open source engine with proprietary assets.

Development

MegaGlest, a cross-platform game, is a fork of real-time classic Glest (which has not been developed since April 2009). The MegaGlest game intends to continue in Glests' spirit and with similar gameplay, while improving existing features and adding more functionality, and therefore continues to use the Glest versioning scheme. The MegaGlest engine is designed to be moddable, with game elements defined by editable XML files. While a map editor and a model viewer are included, additional game assets can also be developed using separate open source applications (such as Blender) and are stored in open and documented formats (G3D, PNG, JPEG, OGG).[6]

MegaGlest focuses on stable releases which provide reliable cross platform multi-player games while implementing new features and delivering new game content. The engine is continuously improved but this is of secondary exiguity after stability. Another Glest fork, GAE,[7] was primarily oriented towards extending the game engine and providing more options for full conversions, and was more experimental in nature. It was suggested that the two forks should merge,[8] but due to different philosophies and goals amongst the developers of both forks this effort was called off during the planning stage.[9]

Reception

  • TuxArena.com: Except for the game saving issue, MegaGlest has everything you would expect from a 3D RTS. (MegaGlest 3.6.0)[10]
  • Softsea.com: Rating: 5 of 5 stars (as of November 2012)[11]
  • Sourceforge: User Rating: 98% recommended (as of February 2013).[12]
  • FreewareFiles.com: Editors Pick, User Rating: 4.74 of 5.00 stars (as of February 2013).[13]
  • Linux Games DB: User Rating: 8.1 of 10 (as of February 2013).[14]
  • Softpedia.com: User Rating: 4.9 of 5.0 stars (as of February 2013).[15]
  • MacGameScout: User Rating: 4.9 of 5.0 stars (as of February 2013).[16]
  • PenguSpy.com: User Rating: 9.53 of 10.00 stars (as of February 2013).[17]

See also

References

  1. ^ "MegaGlest tech trees". 
  2. ^ "Japanese mod on the Glest forums". 
  3. ^ "Enemies and Allies". 
  4. ^ "Vbros Glest Mods". 
  5. ^ "Annex - Conquer the World". 
  6. ^ "Glest Wiki: Modifying Glest". 
  7. ^ "Glest Advanced Engine project page on sourceforge.net". 
  8. ^ "Glest forks to merge into one". 
  9. ^ "Glest forks to join forces?". 
  10. ^ "MegaGlest review on TuxArena.com". 
  11. ^ "MegaGlest review on Softsea.com". 
  12. ^ "MegaGlest reviews on sourceforce.net". 
  13. ^ "MegaGlest reviews on FreewareFiles.com". 
  14. ^ "MegaGlest review on LGDB.org". 
  15. ^ "MegaGlest on Softpedia.com". 
  16. ^ "MegaGlest on MacGameScout.org". 
  17. ^ "MegaGlest on PenguSpy.com". 

External links

  • Official website
  • MegaGlest on SourceForge.net
  • A list of mods for MegaGlest
  • Free Game Alliance, an alliance of leading open source games which MegaGlest is a member of
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.