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Middle Peninsula

Map of Virginia with the Virginia Peninsula in red.

The Middle Peninsula is the second of three large peninsulas on the western shore of Chesapeake Bay in Virginia, in the United States. It lies between the Northern Neck and the Virginia Peninsula. This peninsula is bounded by the Rappahannock River on the north and the York River on the south.[1] It encompasses six Virginia counties: Essex, Gloucester, King and Queen, King William, Mathews, and Middlesex. The Middle Peninsula is known for its quiet rural life, vegetable truck-farming, and fishing.

There are no cities on the Middle Peninsula and little industry. Among the towns found there, West Point has a pulp-and-paper mill, and the unincorporated community of Deltaville is a popular spot for city-dwellers seeking a weekend boating on the bay. Tappahannock is a thriving community on the Rappahannock River, and Urbanna has a small but prosperous tourism industry.

There are two tiny land reservations, home to the Pamunkey and Mattaponi Indian tribes.

The primary highways on the peninsula are U.S. Route 17 (Tidewater Trail), which connects Fredericksburg with the Hampton Roads area, and U.S. Route 360 (Northumberland Highway), which connects the Northern Neck with Richmond and Danville. Before modern highways existed, passenger ferries and steam freighters linked the entire Chesapeake Bay region.

The two southernmost counties on the Middle Peninsula, Gloucester and Mathews, are now considered to be part of the York River. Two of the western counties, King William County and King and Queen County, are part of the Richmond Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA).

See also

References

  1. ^ Stapen, Candyce H. (2011). Explorer's Guide Virginia. The Countryman Press.  

External links

  • middlepeninsula.com, general tourist information
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