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Miss World

Miss World
Logo of the Miss World Pageant.
Motto Beauty with a Purpose
Formation 1951
Type Beauty pageant
Headquarters London
Location
Official language
English
President
Julia Morley
Key people
Eric Morley
Website Official website

The Miss World pageant is the oldest surviving major international Beauty pageant. It was created in the United Kingdom by Eric Morley in 1951.[1][2] Since his death in 2000, Morley's widow, Julia Morley, has co-chaired the pageant.[3][4] Alongside its traditional rival, the Miss Universe contest, Miss World pageant is one of the two most recognized and publicised beauty contests in the world, and also boasts the largest number of participating countries.[5][6][7]

The current Miss World is Rolene Strauss of South Africa who was crowned on 14 December 2014 in London, United Kingdom. Traditionally, Miss World lives in London during her reign.

Contents

  • History 1
    • 20th century 1.1
    • 21st century 1.2
  • Miss World Organization 2
  • The pageant 3
    • Dances of the World 3.1
      • By number of performances 3.1.1
    • Awards 3.2
      • Challenge Events (Formerly known as Fast track awards) 3.2.1
    • Notable winners 3.3
    • Reign Records 3.4
    • Gap Records 3.5
    • Age Records 3.6
    • Delegate Records 3.7
    • Other 3.8
    • Locations 3.9
  • Recent titleholders 4
    • Winners gallery 4.1
    • By number of wins 4.2
    • Top 15 countries by tally 4.3
    • Number of titles by continental region 4.4
  • Continental queens of beauty 5
    • Queens of beauty titles 5.1
  • Pageant controversies 6
    • The 2002 Nigeria contest 6.1
  • Double/Triple Win in a Decade 7
    • No Double/Triple Win 7.1
    • 1951 - 1959 7.2
    • 1960 - 1969 7.3
    • 1980 - 1989 7.4
    • 1990 - 1999 7.5
  • Most Successful Miss World 8
  • See also 9
  • References 10
  • External links 11

History

20th century

The first Miss World, 1951 - Kiki Håkansson from Sweden

In 1951, bikini contest as part of the Festival of Britain celebrations which he called the Festival Bikini Contest.[8] The event was popular with the press, and was dubbed "Miss World" by the media. The swimsuit competition was intended as a promotion for the bikini.[9] which had only recently been introduced onto the market, and which was still widely regarded as immodest. When the 1951 Miss World pageant winner, Kerstin "Kiki" Hakansson from Sweden, was crowned in a bikini, it added to the controversy.

The pageant was originally planned as a one-off event, but upon learning about the upcoming Miss Universe pageant, Morley decided to make the Miss World pageant an annual event.[10][11] Morley registered the "Miss World" name as a trademark,[12] and all future pageants were held under that name. However, because of the controversy arising from Håkansson's crowning in a bikini, countries with religious traditions threatened not to send delegates to future events, and the bikini was condemned by the Pope.[13] Objection to the bikini led to its replacement in all future pageants[14][15] with what was accepted as more modest swimwear, and from 1976 swimsuits were replaced by evening gowns for the crowning.[16] Håkansson remains the only Miss World crowned in a bikini.[12] In Miss World 2013 all participants wore a one-piece swimsuit plus a traditional sarong below the waist as a compromise with local culture.[17]

In 1959, the BBC started broadcasting the pageant. The pageant's popularity grew with the advent of television. During the 1960s and 1970s, Miss World would be among the most watched programs of the year on British television.[18] However, in 1970, the Miss World contest in London was disrupted by women's liberation protesters armed with flour bombs, stink bombs, and water pistols.[19]

In the 1980s, the pageant repositioned itself with the slogan Beauty With a Purpose, with added tests of intelligence and personality.[20] However, in the 1980s, the competition became seen as old-fashioned and politically incorrect in its native Britain, and despite its global appeal, stopped showing on British television until Channel 5 aired it from 1998-2000,[21][22] then it shifted between lesser-known satellite channels, and is now webcast only and little-known in Britain.

21st century

Eric Morley died in 2000, and his wife, Julia, succeeded as chairwoman of the Miss World Organization.[23]

The first black African Miss World winner, Agbani Darego of Nigeria, was crowned in 2001. As part of its marketing strategy, Miss World came up with a "Vote For Me" television special during that edition, featuring the delegates behind the scenes and on the beach, and allowing viewers to either phone in or vote online for their favourites. It also sells its Talent, Beach Beauty and Sports events as television specials to broadcasters.[24]

In 2002 the pageant was slated for Abuja, the capital city of Nigeria to host its final. This choice was controversial, as a northern Nigerian woman, Amina Lawal, was awaiting death by stoning for adultery under Sharia law there, but Miss World chose to use the publicity surrounding its presence to bring greater global awareness and action to Amina's plight (see Controversies section).[25][26]

In 2014, the organization eliminated the swimsuit competition from the pageant.[27]

Miss World Organization

Ivian Sarcos in a school in Mumbai, India

The Miss World Organisation owns and manages the annual Miss World Finals, a competition that has grown into one of the world’s biggest.[28] Since its launch in 1951, the Miss World Organization has raised more than £250 million for children’s charities.[29] Miss World is franchised in more than 100 countries.[30][31] Miss World, Limited is a privately held firm, and thus figures for its earnings, expenses and charitable contributions are not publicly available.

Miss World becomes popular among the viewing public, which warrants the continuity of the pageant not only as a pageant itself but more importantly, an institution for humanitarian causes.[32] Aside from raising millions of pounds for charities around the globe under the banner of its "Beauty with a Purpose" program, Miss World is also credited with directly influencing a dramatic increase in tourism in Sanya, China, host city of the Miss World finals in 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, and 2010.[33]

The pageant

In the year preceding the global finals, each delegate must win her national title or a specially designated Miss World national preliminary. Miss World's national preliminaries are conducted by their licence-holders, who hold the franchise to use the "Miss World" name in their country. The annual final is typically a month-long event, with several preliminary galas, dinners, balls and activities, culminating in a globally telecast final show in which the field is narrowed to between 15–20 delegates.

Dances of the World

Dances of the World is Miss World's most popular segment since its launch on 2009. It doesn't award a prize, it only show the contestants's cultures and traditions displayed through dance and music.

By number of performances

Country/Territory Performances Performing Years
 India 3 2010, 2012, 2014
 Latvia 2009, 2011, 2012
 Mexico 2009, 2011, 2012
 China PR 2 2011, 2013
 Mongolia 2012, 2014
   Nepal 2011, 2013
 Scotland 2011, 2014
 Sierra Leone 2009, 2011
 Slovakia 2013, 2014
 Korea 2009, 2012
 Tahiti 2009, 2010
 Venezuela 2011, 2013
 Bolivia 1 2014
 Botswana 2010
 Brazil 2010
 Bulgaria 2010
 Canada 2012
 Chile 2013
 Dominican Republic 2013
 Egypt 2010
 Equatorial Guinea 2012
 Fiji 2012
 Finland 2014
 Georgia 2012
 Guam 2012
 Hong Kong 2010
 Indonesia 2013
 Ireland 2013
 Kenya 2014
 Namibia 2013
 Nicaragua 2012
 Philippines 2013
 Puerto Rico 2011
 South Africa 2011
 Spain 2010
 Sri Lanka 2009
 Ukraine 2011
 United States 2014
 US Virgin Islands 2013

Awards

  • Venezuela has won the Miss Photogenic award four times (1984, 1990, 1995, 1996).
  • Two Miss World winner were awarded Miss World Continental Groups Northern Europe by SMS voting : Unnur Birna Vilhjálmsdóttir (Iceland 2005), Taťána Kuchařová (Czech Republic 2006).

Challenge Events (Formerly known as Fast track awards)

Since 2003 Miss World pageant also features Fast Track events during the preliminary round. The winners of Fast Track events are automatically qualified to enter the final round.

Since 2011 winners of the challenge events are no longer automatically qualified to the final round. Instead, winners and finalists of these events will be awarded bonus points to their preliminary scores. Delegates with the highest points (bonus of challenge events included) are qualified to the final round.

Challenge (Fast Track) events which have been used since 2003 are:

Notable winners

  • 1951: Kiki Håkansson is the first Miss World from Europe, also the original Miss World titleholder.
  • 1954: Antigone Costanda is the first African and the first from a Muslim-dominated country to win Miss World Title.
  • 1955: Susana Duijm is the first Latin-American and the first from Americas to win Miss World Title.
  • 1963: Carole Joan Crawford is the first from the Caribbean to win Miss World Title.
  • 1966: Reita Faria is the first Asian and first contestant representing India to win Miss World Title.
  • 1970: Jennifer Hosten is the first Black Miss World. She is also the first black winner in the Big 4 Pageants.
  • 1989: Aneta Kręglicka is the first Eastern European to win Miss World Title.
  • 2001: Agbani Darego is the first Black African to win Miss World Title.
  • 2007: Zhang Zilin is the first Miss World from East Asia.
  • 2013: Megan Young is the first Southeast Asian to win the title, and the second Miss World to present the show on her final day of reign after Gina Tolleson did in 1991. However, Young is the first and only Miss World to present the finals as a main presenter whereas Tolleson presented as a correspondent. This win also marked that the country won all Big Four international beauty pageants, first in Asia and third globally after Brazil and Venezuela, both from South America.

Reign Records

  • Longest Completed Reign
    • Kerstin Håkansson reigns for 1 year, 3 months, 16 days or (1 year, 108 days). She was crowned on 29 July 1951 and crowned her successor on 14 November 1952.
    • Megan Young reigns for 1 year, 2 months, 16 days or (1 year, 77 days). She was crowned 28 September 2013 and crowned her successor on 14 Dec. 2014.
    • Taťána Kuchařová reigns for 1 year, 2 months, 2 days or (1 year, 62 days). She was crowned on 30 September 2006 and crowned her successor on 1 Dec. 2007.
  • Shortest Completed Reign
    • Ivian Sarcos reigns for 9 months, 12 days or (285 days). She was crowned on 6 November 2011 and crowned her successor on 18 August 2012.
    • Unnur Birna Vilhjálmsdóttir reigns for 9 months, 20 days or (294 days). She was crowned on 10 December 2005 and crowned her successor on 30 September 2006.
  • Shortest Reign: their first runner-ups were crowned later on
    • . due to dethronement
    • Gabriella Brum reigns for (18 hours) on 27 November 1980. due to resignation

Gap Records

Age Records

  • Oldest Winners
    • Aneta Kręglicka, oldest winner at the age of 24 years 244 days when she was crowned on 22 November 1989.
    • Diana Hayden, second oldest winner at the age of 24 years 205 days when she was crowned on 22 November 1997.
  • Youngest Winners
    • Wilnelia Merced, youngest winner at the age of 18 years 39 days when she was crowned on 20 November 1975. (age is verified)
    • Lisa Hanna, second youngest winner at the age of 18 years 99 days when she was crowned on 27 November 1993.
    • Priyanka Chopra, who won the Miss World 2000 title representing India was 18 years 166 days of age when she was crowned.
    • Antigone Costanda, born-circa 1935, crowned - 18 Oct. 1954 (she is 18 but exact birth date is unverified)
    • Eva Rueber-Staier, born-circa 1952, crowned - 27 November 1969 (she is 18 but exact birth date is unverified)

Delegate Records

  • 1952: year with the least number of delegates with 11 to which the eventual winner was May Louise Flodin on 14 November.
  • 2013: year with the most number of delegates with 127 to which the eventual winner was Megan Young on 28 September.

Other

  • Miss World remains the only one of the major international pageants with two winners resigned or dethroned: Miss World replaced 1974 and Gabriella Brum in 1980.

Locations

For the full list of venues, see List of Miss World titleholders.

  • Outside United Kingdom, South Africa has hosted the most Miss World pageants, with seven. The various locations were:
  • Apart from the United Kingdom and South Africa, the other states to host the pageant more than once are:

Recent titleholders

For the full list of titleholders, see List of Miss World titleholders.
Year Country/Territory Miss World National Title Location Number of Entrants
2015 TBA TBA TBA Sanya, China PR TBA
2014  South Africa Rolene Strauss Miss South Africa London, United Kingdom 121
2013  Philippines Megan Young Miss World Philippines Bali, Indonesia 127
2012  China PR Yu Wenxia Miss China World Ordos City, China PR 116
2011  Venezuela Ivian Sarcos Miss Venezuela London, United Kingdom 113
2010  United States Alexandria Mills Miss World America Sanya, China PR 115

Winners gallery

By number of wins

Winners of Miss World by country
Country/Territory Titles Winning Years
 Venezuela 6 1955, 1981, 1984, 1991, 1995, 2011
 India 5 1966, 1994, 1997, 1999, 2000
 United Kingdom 5 1961, 1964, 1965, 1974, 1983
 South Africa 3 1958, 1974, 2014
 United States 1973, 1990, 2010
 Iceland 1985, 1988, 2005
 Jamaica 1963, 1976, 1993
 Sweden 1951, 1952, 1977
 China PR 2 2007, 2012
 Russia 1992, 2008
 Peru 1967, 2004
 Austria 1969, 1987
 Argentina 1960, 1978
 Australia 1968, 1972
 Germany 1956, 1980
 Netherlands 1959, 1962
 Philippines 1 2013
 Gibraltar 2009
 Czech Republic 2006
 Ireland 2003
 Turkey 2002
 Nigeria 2001
 Israel 1998
 Greece 1996
 Poland 1989
 Trinidad & Tobago 1986
 Dominican Republic 1982
 Guam 1980
 Bermuda 1979
 Puerto Rico 1975
 Brazil 1971
 Grenada 1970
 Finland 1957
 Egypt 1954
 France 1953

Top 15 countries by tally

For the full details, see Miss World country rankings.
Rank Country/Territory Miss World 1st Runner-Up 2nd Runner-Up 3rd Runner-Up 4th Runner-Up 5th Runner-Up 6th Runner-Up Semifinalists / Quarterfinalists Total
1  Venezuela 6 2 4 2 4 0 1 11 30
2  United Kingdom 5 5 3 5 3 4 3 10 37
3  India 5 1 0 2 1 0 2 12 23
4  United States 3 5 3 0 7 5 3 21 47
5  South Africa 3 3 6 1 4 2 0 15 34
6  Sweden 3 1 0 2 2 2 0 12 22
7  Jamaica 3 0 3 1 3 1 1 12 24
8  Iceland 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 7
9  Australia 2 2 4 2 1 1 1 14 27
10  Argentina 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 7 12
11  Germany 2 1 3 1 1 0 1 9 18
12  Peru 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 7
13  Netherlands 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 10 15
14  Austria 2 0 1 2 0 0 1 11 17
15  China PR 2 0 1 0 3 0 0 2 8

Number of titles by continental region

Continent Titles Countries/Territories
Europe 26 United Kingdom* (5), Iceland and Sweden (3), Austria, Germany*, Netherlands and Russia (2), Czech Republic, Finland, France, Gibraltar, Greece, Ireland, Poland, Turkey (1)
Americas 15 Venezuela (6), United States (3), Argentina and Peru (2), Bermuda and Brazil (1)
Asia 9 India (5), China (2) Israel and Philippines (1)
Oceania 3 Australia (2), Guam* (1)
Caribbean 7 Jamaica (3), Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Grenada, and Trinidad & Tobago (1)
Africa 5 South Africa* (3), Egypt and Nigeria (1)

Continental queens of beauty

The following is a list of Continental Queens of Beauty winners since 2004.

Year Africa Americas Asia & Oceania Caribbean Europe
2015 TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA
2014  South Africa
Rolene Strauss
 United States
Elizabeth Safrit
 Guyana
Rafieya Husain
 Hungary
Edina Kulcsár
2013  Ghana
Naa Okailey Shooter
 Brazil
Sancler Frantz
 Jamaica
Gina Hargitay
 France
Marine Lorphelin
2012  South Sudan
Atong Demach
 Brazil
Mariana Notarangelo
 China PR
Yu Wenxia
 Jamaica
Deanna Robins
 Wales
Sophie Elizabeth Moulds
2011  South Africa
Bokang Montjane
 Venezuela
Ivian Sarcos
 Philippines
Gwendoline Ruais
 Puerto Rico
Amanda Vilanova
 England
Alize Lily Mounter
2010  Botswana
Emma Wareus
 United States
Alexandria Mills
 China PR
Xiao Tang
 St. Lucia
Aiasha Gustave
 Ireland
Emma Britt Waldron
2009  South Africa
Tatum Keshwar
 Mexico
Perla Beltrán
 Korea
Kim Joo-ri
 Barbados
Leah Marville
 Gibraltar
Kaiane Aldorino
2008  Angola
Brigith dos Santos
 Venezuela
Hannelly Quintero
 India
Parvathy Omanakuttan
 Trinidad & Tobago
Gabrielle Walcott
 Russia
Ksenia Sukhinova
2007  Angola
Micaela Reis
 Mexico
Carolina Morán
 China PR
Zhang Zilin
 Trinidad & Tobago
Valene Maharaj
 Sweden
Annie Oliv
2006  Angola
Stiviandra Oliveira
 Brazil
Jane Borges
 Australia
Sabrina Houssami (as Asia-Pacific)
 Jamaica
Sara Lawrence
2005  Tanzania
Nancy Sumari
 Mexico
Dafne Molina
 Korea
Oh Eun-young (as Asia-Pacific)
 Puerto Rico
Ingrid Marie Rivera

Queens of beauty titles

These are the countries with the most Continental Queen of Beauty titles per continental group (region in bold) throughout the years:

Country Titles Awarded As Winning Years
 Venezuela 12 Americas 1981, 1984, 1987, 1988, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1999, 2008, 2011
 South Africa 12 Africa 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2009, 2011, 2014
 Jamaica 10 Caribbean 1990, 1991, 1993, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2006, 2012, 2013
 Australia 7 Oceania 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1988, 1989, 2013
1 Asia & Oceania 1991
1 Asia-Pacific 2006
 India 7 Asia & Oceania 1994, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2008, 2014
 China PR 6 Asia & Oceania 2001, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2010, 2012
 Philippines 3 Asia & Oceania 1993, 2004, 2011
3 Asia 1982, 1986, 2013
 Israel 3 Asia 1983, 1984, 1985
2 Europe 1998, 1999
 Korea 4 Asia & Oceania 1988, 1995, 2005, 2009
 Thailand 2 Asia & Oceania 1989, 1992

Pageant controversies

The Miss World pageant has been the target of many controversies since its inception.

  • In 1970, feminist protesters threw flour bombs during the live event at London's Royal Albert Hall, momentarily alarming the host, Bob Hope.[34][35]
  • In [36]
  • In 1976, several countries went on a boycott, because the pageant included both a Caucasian and African representative for South Africa.[37] South Africa competed for the last time in 1977, before it was welcomed back in 1991 as Apartheid disintegrated.[38]
  • The 1980 winner Gabriella Brum of Germany resigned one day after winning, initially claiming her boyfriend disapproved. A few days later it emerged that she had been forced to resign after it was discovered that she posed naked for a magazine.[39]
  • In 1996, wide-scale protests took place in Bangalore, India, over the hosting of the beauty contest. The swimsuit shootings were moved to the Seychelles, and heavy security was placed. Despite the chaos, the pageant's live telecast went on smoothly.[40][41][42]

The 2002 Nigeria contest

In the year leading up the finals in Nigeria, several European title holders lobbied their governments and the EU parliament to support Amina Lawal's cause.[43][44] A number of contestants followed the lead of Kathrine Sørland of Norway in boycotting the contest (despite the controversy Sørland would go on to become a semifinalist in both the Miss World and Miss Universe contest), while others such as Costa Rica were instructed by their national governments and parliaments not to attend the contest. Among the other boycotting nations were Denmark, Spain, Switzerland, Panama, Belgium and Kenya. There was further controversy over the possibly suspended participation of France and South Africa, which may or may not have been due to the boycott.[45] For her part, Lawal asked that contestants not suspend their participation in the contest, saying that it was for the good of her country and that they could, as the representative of Sweden had earlier remarked, make a much stronger case for her on the ground in Nigeria.[46]

Despite the increasing international profile the boycott was garnering in the world press, the contest went ahead in Nigeria after being rescheduled to avoid taking place during Ramadan, with many prominent nations sending delegates. Osmel Sousa of Venezuela, one of the world's most influential national directors, famously said "there is no question about it (the participation of Miss Venezuela in the contest)." The trouble did not end there, however. A ThisDay (Lagos, Nigeria) newspaper editorial suggesting that Muhammad would probably have chosen one of his wives from among the contestants had he been alive to see it (this suggestion would have been considered an insult to most Moslems because contestants bared themselves in bathing suits which is considered immoral by conservative Muslim standards), resulted in inter-religious riots that started on 22 November in which over 200 people were killed in the city of Kaduna, along with many houses of worship being burned by religious zealots.[47] Because of these riots, the 2002 pageant was moved to London, following widely circulated reports that the representatives of Canada and Korea had withdrawn from the contest and returned to their respective countries out of safety concerns. A fatwa urging the beheading of the woman who wrote the offending words, Isioma Daniel, was issued in Nigeria, but was declared null and void by the relevant Saudi Arabian authorities.[48][49][50][51] Upon the pageant's return to England, many of the boycotting contestants chose to attend, including Miss Norway, Kathrine Sørland, who was ironically tipped in the last few days as the number one favourite for the crown she had previously boycotted.[52][53][54][55][56]

The eventual winner of the pageant was Azra Akın of Turkey, the first predominantly Muslim country to hold the title since Egypt in 1954.[57]

Double/Triple Win in a Decade

No Double/Triple Win

  • 1970 - 1979
  • 2000 - 2009

1951 - 1959

1960 - 1969

1980 - 1989

1990 - 1999

Most Successful Miss World

Miss World 1994 Aishwarya Rai from India was honored as the most successful Miss World ever during the finale night of Miss World 2014 in December 2014.[58]

See also

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^
  6. ^
  7. ^
  8. ^
  9. ^
  10. ^
  11. ^
  12. ^ a b
  13. ^
  14. ^
  15. ^
  16. ^
  17. ^
  18. ^
  19. ^
  20. ^
  21. ^
  22. ^
  23. ^ Miss World contest history Archived 8 March 2014 at the Wayback Machine
  24. ^
  25. ^
  26. ^
  27. ^
  28. ^
  29. ^ Philanthropy World. Beauty with a Purpose
  30. ^
  31. ^
  32. ^
  33. ^ EuroBiz Magazine, July 2006. Sanya's place in the sun
  34. ^ History of Miss World 1970 – 1979
  35. ^
  36. ^ Miss World is stripped of her title
  37. ^
  38. ^
  39. ^
  40. ^ CNN – Miss Greece now Miss World, despite pageant protests
  41. ^
  42. ^
  43. ^
  44. ^
  45. ^
  46. ^
  47. ^
  48. ^
  49. ^
  50. ^
  51. ^
  52. ^
  53. ^
  54. ^
  55. ^
  56. ^
  57. ^
  58. ^ [1]

External links

  • Miss World official website
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