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Motorola 6800

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Title: Motorola 6800  
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Subject: Instructions per second, Motorola 6800 family, Motorola 68000, Freescale S08, Freescale 68HC08
Collection: 1974 Introductions, Motorola Microprocessors
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Motorola 6800

  • ^ "Semiconductor makers continue to trim employment". Electronics (New York: McGraw-Hill) 47 (24): p. 46. November 28, 1974. 
  • ^ Waller, Larry (November 13, 1975). "Motorola seeks to end skid". Electronics (New York: McGraw-Hill) 48 (23): pp. 96–98.  Summary: Semiconductor Products split into two parts, integrated circuits and discrete components. Semiconductor losses for the last four quarters exceeded $30 million. The sales organization lost its sensitivity to customer needs, "delays in responding to price cuts meant that customers bought elsewhere." Technical problems plagued IC production. The troubles are "not in design, but in chip and die yields." Problems have been solved. The MC6800 microprocessor "arrived in November 1974."
  • ^ Tedlow, Richard S. (2007). Andy Grove: The Life and Times of an American Business Icon. New York: Portfolio. p. 158.   "By the end of the year [1974], Intel had fired fully 30 percent of its thirty-five hundred employees."
  • ^ . Electronics (New York: McGraw-Hill) 48 (1): p. 37. January 9, 1975.  Motorola advertisement emphasizing their complete set of peripheral chips and development tools. This shorten the customers product design cycle.
  • ^ Motorola 6800 Oral History (2008) p. 18
  • ^ Bagnall (2006), "On the Edge". Page 10, "While still employed at Motorola, Peddle tried raising money to fund his new microprocessor.
  • ^   Comparison of the 6502 and the 6800 microprocessors. Author visited MOS Technology in August 1975.
  • ^ "Microprocessor line offers 4, 8,16 bits". Electronics (New York: McGraw-Hill) 48 (15): p. 118. July 24, 1975.  The article covers the 6501 and 6502 plus the 28 pin versions that would only address 4K of memory. It also covered future devices such as "a design that Peddle calls a pseudo 16."
  • ^ Sugarman, Robert (25 August 1975). "Does the Country Need A Good $20 Microprocessor?". EE Times (Manhasset, New York: CMP Publications): p. 25. 
  • ^ "MOS 6501 Microprocessor beats 'em all". Electronics (New York: McGraw-Hill) 48 (16): pp. 60–61. August 7, 1975. 
  • ^ . Computer (IEEE Computer Society) 8 (9): pp 38–39. September 1975.  
  • ^ Motorola (October 30, 1975). . Electronics (McGraw-Hill) 48 (22): p. 11.  The quantity one price for the MC6800 was reduced from $175 to $69. The previous price for 50 to 99 units was $125.
  • ^ "Motorola Sues MOS Technology". Microcomputer Digest (Cupertino CA: Microcomputer Associates) 2 (6): p. 11. December 1975. 
  • ^ "MOS Technology Drops 6501". Microcomputer Digest (Cupertino CA: Microcomputer Associates) 2 (11): p. 4. May 1976. 
  • ^ Teener, Mike (May 1976). "Politics and Intrigue". SCCS Interface (Los Angeles: Southern California Computer Society) 1 (6): p. 58. "So Motorola sued and just recently won an out-of-court settlement that has MOS Technology paying $200,000 and stopping production on the 6501."
  • ^ "New 6800 Pricing". SCCS Interface (Los Angeles: Southern California Computer Society) 1 (6): p. 63. May 1976.  The new prices for the Motorola 6800 were $35 for 1–9 units, $32.50 for 10–49 and $29.25 for 50–99.
  • ^ Motorola was awarded the following US Patents on the 6800 microprocessor family: 3962682, 3968478, 3975712, 3979730, 3979732, 3987418, 4003028, 4004281, 4004283, 4006457, 4010448, 4016546, 4020472, 4030079, 4032896, 4037204, 4040035, 4069510, 4071887, 4086627, 4087855, 4090236, 4145751, 4218740, 4263650
  • ^ Shima, Masatoshi; Federico Faggin; Ralph Ungermann (August 19, 1976). "Z-80 chip set heralds third microprocessor generation". Electronics (New York: McGraw-Hill) 49 (17): pp. 89–93. 
  • ^ Slater, Michael (April 27, 2007). "Zilog Oral History Panel on the Founding of the Company and the Development of the Z80 Microprocessor". Mountain View, CA: Computer History Museum. 
  • ^ Michalopoulos, D.A. (July 1976). "New Products: Zilog microcomputer". Computer (IEEE Computer Society) 9 (7): p. 69.  
  • ^ "New Clock Chip for 6800 Systems". Byte (Peterborough NH: Byte Publications) 2 (12): p. 210. December 1977.  Requiring only a 5 V supply and a quartz crystal or an RC network, the MC6875 provides buffered 2 phase clock outputs… $3.75 in 1000 piece quantities from Motorola Linear Products
  • ^ "Texas Instruments and Motorola pare down microprocessors for low end market". Electronic (McGraw-Hill) 50 (5): pp. 34, 36. March 3, 1977.  MC6802 microprocessor has oscillator and 128 byte RAM. MC6846 has ROM Timer and I/O. Samples later this month.
  • ^ Product Preview MC6801. Austin, Texas: Motorola Semiconductor Products. August 1978. NP-93. .
  • ^ Motorola 6800 Oral History (2008) pp. 21-22
  • ^ Product Preview MC6809. Austin, Texas: Motorola Semiconductor Products. December 1978. NP-98 R1. .
  • ^ H. Edward Roberts; William Yates (January 1975). "Altair 8800 minicomputer". Popular Electronics (Ziff Davis) 7 (1): pp. 33–38. 
  • ^ "Computer System $650". Radio-Electronics (New York: Gernsback Publications) 42 (7): p.88. July 1975. 
  • ^ Anderson, Bruce (July 1976). "Assembling a Sphere". Byte (Peterborough NH: Byte Publications) 1 (11): pp. 18–20. 
  • ^ Pollini, Steve (April 1976). "680-b ready for production". Computer Notes (MITS) 1 (11): p. 8. MITS is now ready to begin full production of the Altair 680b 
  • ^ Norell, Melvin (May 31, 1977). "Dear Sphere Microcomputer User". Programma News Letter (Los Angeles: Programma Consultants): pp. 1–3. 
  • ^ Ahl, David; Green, Burchenal (1980). The Best of Creative Computing Volume 3. Morristown, NJ: Creative Computing Press. pp. 106–108.   Interview with Daniel Meyer at the "Personal Computing 77" conference at Atlantic City NJ in August 1977
  • ^ . Byte (Peterborough NH: Green Publishing) 2 (10): Cover 2. October 1977. 
  • ^  
  • ^ Ad for Tektronix 4051 in Electronics April 1976
  • ^ "Heathkit Microprocessor Course". Popular Science (New York: Times Mirror Magazines) 211 (5): p. 133. November 1977.  
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