Mucous cell

Mucous gland
Vertical section of papilla foliata of the rabbit, passing across the folia. (Serous gland labeled at bottom right.)
Human submaxillary gland. At the right is a group of mucous alveoli, at the left a group of serous alveoli.
Latin glandula mucosa
Gray's subject #242 1131
Code

Mucous glands, found in several different parts of the body, typically stain lighter than serous glands during standard histological preparation. Most are multicellular, but goblet cell are single-celled glands.

Mucous salivary glands

The mucous salivary glands are similar in structure to the buccal and labial glands.

They are found especially at the back part behind the vallate papillae, but are also present at the apex and marginal parts.

In this connection the anterior lingual glands (Blandin or Nuhn) require special notice.

They are situated on the under surface of the apex of the tongue, one on either side of the frenulum, where they are covered by a fasciculus of muscular fibers derived from the Styloglossus and Longitudinalis inferior.

They are from 12 to 25 mm. long, and about 8 mm. broad, and each opens by three or four ducts on the under surface of the apex.

See also

External links

  • eMedicine Dictionary
  • Anatomy Atlases - Microscopic Anatomy, plate 10.182 - "Lingual glands"
  • Overview at siumed.edu

This article incorporates text from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy.

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