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New Xiang

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Title: New Xiang  
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New Xiang

New Xiang
New Hunanese, Chang-Yi
Native to People's Republic of China
Region Hunan
Native speakers
(no estimate available)
Language codes
ISO 639-3
ISO 639-6 cayi
Glottolog chan1316[1]
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New Xiang is in red. It is in contact with Southwestern Mandarin to the northwest, Gan to the east, Old Xiang to the west, and Hengzhou Xiang to the south (yellow).

New Xiang, also known as Chang-Yi (长益片 / 長益片) is the dominant form of Xiang Chinese, or Hunanese. It is spoken in northeastern areas of Hunan adjacent to areas where Southwestern Mandarin and Gan are spoken. Under their influence, it has lost some of the conservative phonological characteristics that distinguish Old Xiang. However, New Xiang is still very difficult for Mandarin speakers to understand, particularly the old style of New Xiang.

Dialects and Regions

New-Xiang-speaking cities and counties are mainly located in the northeast part of Hunan, the lower river of Xiang and Zi. Changsha is representative.

There are three main subdialects under New Xiang.
Subdialect Main Counties
Chang-Tan Urban Changsha, Changsha County, Wangcheng, Ningxiang, Liuyang*, Xiangyin, Miluo, Nanxian, Urban Zhuzhou, Zhuzhou County, Urban Xiangtan, Xiangtan County, Nanxian
Yi-Yuan Urban Yiyang, Yuanjiang, Taojiang
Yueyang Yueyang County, Yueyang

References

  1. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "New Xiang". Glottolog 2.2. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 


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