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North Face (Everest)

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North Face (Everest)

North face of Mount Everest

The North Face is the northern side of [1] The North Face is a place where one author/climber noted, "a simple slip would mean death."[1]

Views

Everest's north face, lit up by the setting sun

Diagram

Points of interest on the north face

Routes

  Green line
Standard route from north, mainly identical with Mallory's route in 1924; high camps on c.7700 m and 8300 m (indicated by two triangles), present day camp on 8300 m is located a bit further west.
  Navy blue line
Zakharov Couloir.
  Light blue line
Messner's traverse from north ridge to Norton Couloir in 1980 ("Everest Solo by Fair Means") w/o O2.
  Red line
Great Couloir or Norton Couloir.
  Purple line
Complete northeast ridge with Three Pinnacles; Japanese route to the top. Climbed before by Russell Brice & Comp., but only the purple-marked part of the ridge, without going to the summit; descent via standard route.
  Yellow line and
  Dark blue line
American 1963, "The West Ridge".
  Orange line
Yugoslavian route, 1979.
  Dark blue line
Hornbein Couloir.
1 Resting place of Mallory's body, discovered in 1999 (graveyard with more than 15 bodies, according to Conrad Anker).
2 1st Step, resting place of Francys Arsentiev, "Green Boots", David Sharp.
3 2nd Pinnacle, resting place of Peter Boardman (+1982) in 1992.
? 2nd step, base at 8605 m, c.30 m high, (difficulty: 5–9/10).
(a) Point at ca. 8325 m, reached by George Ingle Finch with supplementary oxygen in 1922.
(b) Point at 8572 m on the western side of the Couloir, reached by Edward Felix Norton 1924 without supplementary oxygen (Norton preferred climbing the wall rather than climbing the ridge).
(c) Area left out by the Yugoslavian party on their "complete West Ridge" ascent in 1979.
(d) Difficult area that forced Americans, Tom Hornbein and Willi Unsoeld, to traverse from the west ridge to the north face in 1963.
Changtse is in the foreground

Location

Southern and northern climbing routes as seen from the International Space Station. (The names on the photo are links to corresponding pages.)

Above

View from above of all sides, including the northern face

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c The Other Side of Everest: Climbing the North Face Through the Killer Storm By Matt Dickinson

External links

  • Mt. Everest Northeast Ridge Route
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