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Papyrus 110

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Papyrus 110

Papyrus 110 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), designated by the symbol \mathfrak{P}110, is a fragment of a manuscript (handwritten) copy of the Gospel of Matthew from the New Testament written on papyrus in Greek. The surviving text of Matthew consists of six verses—10:13-15 and 10:25-27—they are also in a fragmentary condition. The manuscript has been assigned an early 4th century date, palaeographically by the Institute for New Testament Textual Research (INTF). According to Comfort, \mathfrak{P}110 might even have been composed as early as the 3rd century.[1] The manuscript currently is housed in the Papyrology Rooms of the Sackler Library at Oxford University, with the shelf number P. Oxy. 4494.[2]

Text


The Greek text of this fragment (and its parent codex) is considered to be representative of the Alexandrian text-type.[1]

It has several unique readings in Matt 10:14.

  • εξερχομενων υμων (as you are leaving) — This genitive absolute is a unique textual variant. All other witnesses have εξερχομενοι, a nominative plural participle, normally interpreted as semitism for an imperative (Leave!). \mathfrak{P}110 specifies that the plurality of people leaving (εξερχομαι, literally 'coming out') is explicitly 'all of you' (υμας)—the disciples whom Jesus is addressing.
  • πολεως η κωμης (city or village) — \mathfrak{P}110 agrees with Codex Sinaiticus (א), Minuscule 892 and Family 13 (f13). Other witnesses, including Codex Vaticanus (B) omit η κωμης.
  • omit εκεινης (that) — \mathfrak{P}110 agrees with Codex Bezae (D) and Old-Latin manuscripts. The majority of witnesses include this feminine demonstrative, agreeing with two feminine nouns οικια (house) and πολις. (It would also agree with κωμη.)
  • απο (from) — This is another unique variant. Codex Sinaiticus (א), Codex Ephraemi (C), Minuscule 33 and 892 have εκ. Codex Vaticanus and other manuscripts have no preposition, just the genitive case, normally interpreted as a genitive of separation.
  • εκμαξατε (wipe) — This too is a unique variant, all other witnesses have εκτιναξατε (shake).[3]
Matthew 10:14 in \mathfrak{P}110
Matthew 10:14 in Editio Regia (1550)
Matthew 10:14 in NA27
και ος αν μη δεξηται υμας μηδε ακουση τους λογους εξερχομενων υμων εξω της οικιας η της πολεως η κωμης εκμαξατε τον κονιορτον απο των ποδων υμων. και ος εαν μη δεξηται υμας μηδε ακουση τους λογους υμων, εξερχομενοι της οικιας η της πολεως εκεινης εκτιναξατε τον κονιορτον των ποδων υμων. και ος αν μη δεξηται υμας μηδε ακουση τους λογους υμων, εξερχομενοι εξω της οικιας η της πολεως εκεινης εκτιναξατε τον κονιορτον των ποδων υμων.
And whoever does not accept you nor listen to the words, as you leave, out of the house or the city or village, wipe the dust away from your feet. And if anyone does not accept you nor listen to your words, leave that house or city, shake the dust from your feet. And whoever does not accept you nor listen to your words, leave, out of that house or city, shake the dust from your feet.

See also

References

Further reading

External links

Images

  • P.Oxy.LXIV 4494 from Papyrology at Oxford's "POxy: Oxyrhynchus Online"
  • \mathfrak{P}110 10:13-15
  • \mathfrak{P}110 10:25-27

Official registration

Bible portal
  • University of Münster. Retrieved April 9, 2008

Transcription and Translation

  • Transcription and English Literal Translation

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