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Pronunciation

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Title: Pronunciation  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: List of bog bodies, Portugal/Selected biography archive, Speech repetition, Regional accents of English, Pronunciation (simple guide to markup, British)
Collection: Phonetics, Speech
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Pronunciation

Pronunciation is the way a word or a language is spoken, or the manner in which someone utters a word. If one is said to have "correct pronunciation", then it refers to both within a particular dialect.

A word can be spoken in different ways by various individuals or groups, depending on many factors, such as: the duration of the cultural exposure of their childhood, the location of their current residence, speech or voice disorders,[1] their ethnic group, their social class, or their education.[2]

1. Nose; 2. Lips; 3. Teeth; 4. Palate; 5.

Linguistic terminology

Syllables are counted as units of sound (phones) that they use in their language. The branch of linguistics which studies these units of sound is phonetics. Phones which play the same role are grouped together into classes called phonemes; the study of these is phonemics or phonematics or phonology. Phones as components of articulation are usually described using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA).[3]

See also

  • Elocution
  • Forvo
  • — the principal key used in WorldHeritage articles to transcribe the pronunciation of English words
  • — a secondary key for pronunciation, which mimics English orthography
  • — another secondary key, more familiar to users of traditional US dictionaries
  • Wiktionary:Pronunciation - entries in the English Wiktionary may contain a Pronunciation section

References

  1. ^ Beech, John R.; Harding, Leonora; Hilton-Jones, Diana (1993). Assessment in speech and language therapy. CUP Archive. p. 55.  
  2. ^ Labov, William (2003). "Some Sociolinguistic Principles". In Paulston, Christina Bratt; Tucker, G. Richard. Sociolinguistics: the essential readings. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 234–250.  
  3. ^ Schultz, Tanja; Kirchhoff, Katrin (2008). Multilingual speech processing. Academic Press. p. 12.  


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