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Reconnaissance aircraft

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Title: Reconnaissance aircraft  
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Subject: Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-25, List of supersonic aircraft, List of active United Kingdom military aircraft, Lockheed U-2, Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird
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Reconnaissance aircraft

A USAF SR-71 high-speed reconnaissance aircraft
USAF TR-1 version of the U-2
RCAF CP-140A Arcturus reconnaissance aircraft
USAF MQ-1/RQ-1 Predator

A reconnaissance aircraft is a manned or unmanned military aircraft designed, or adapted, to carry out aerial reconnaissance. Their roles are to collect imagery intelligence, signals intelligence, and Measurement and signature intelligence.

Contents

  • History 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

History

Use of balloons for reconnaissance by the French during battles

During the Napoleonic Wars and Franco-Prussian War, balloons were used for aerial reconnaissance by the French.[1]

In World War I, aircraft were deployed during the early phases in reconnaissance roles (eyes of the army) to aid ground forces.[1]

Aerial reconnaissance was mostly carried out by versions of standard fighters and bombers equipped with cameras.[2] After World War II and during the Cold War, the United States developed several dedicated reconnaissance designs, including the U-2 and the SR-71, to deal with the nuclear threat from the Soviet Union.[3]

Today, much of the strategic role has passed over to satellites,[4] and the tactical role to unmanned aerial vehicles. This was proven by the successful use by Israel and by the Desert Storm operation by the United States.[5]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b http://centennialofflight.net/essay/Air_Power/WWI-reconnaissance/AP2.htm
  2. ^ During World War II, "F-Planes" Weren't Fighters | Defense Media Network
  3. ^ http://www.centennialofflight.net/essay/Air_Power/cold_war/AP34.htm
  4. ^ Satelite.Com Spy Satellites
  5. ^ https://fas.org/irp/program/collect/docs/97-0349.pdf

External links

  • spyflight
  • "A Tale of Two Airplanes" by Kingdon R. "King" Hawes, Lt Col, USAF (Ret.)
  • They Brave Death for a Picture: desperate chances taken by the flying camera-men, Popular Science monthly, January 1919, page 18-19, Scanned by Google Books: https://books.google.com/books?id=HykDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA18
  • [2]"Army-Lockheed YO-3A Silent Airplane in Vietnam"
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