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Reduction in rank

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Title: Reduction in rank  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Degradation, Reclusione Militare, 1995 Okinawa rape incident, Military law, Roman military decorations and punishments
Collection: Military Law, Military Ranks, Punishments
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Reduction in rank

Reduction in rank may refer to two separate concepts:

Contents

  • History 1
  • United States 2
    • Notable examples of demotion in rank in the US Forces 2.1
  • References 3
  • External links 4

History

Reduction in rank (Latin gradus deiectio meaning position degradation) was used as a Roman military punishment. [1]

United States

The Uniform Code of Military Justice Subchapter III, non-judicial punishment, § 815. Article 15, commanding officer's non-judicial punishment, authorizes commanding officers to "in addition to or in lieu of admonition or reprimand" impose "reduction to the next inferior pay grade, if the grade from which demoted is within the promotion authority of the officer imposing the reduction or any officer subordinate to the one who imposes the reduction." Additionally, an officer of the grade of major, lieutenant commander, or above is authorized to impose "reduction to the lowest or any intermediate pay grade, if the grade from which demoted is within the promotion authority of the officer imposing the reduction or any officer subordinate to the one who imposes the reduction, but an enlisted member in a pay grade above E-4 may not be reduced more than two pay grades."

Uniform Code of Military Justice Subchapter VIII, Sentences, provides that:

§ 858a. ART. 58a. SENTENCES: REDUCTION IN ENLISTED GRADE UPON APPROVAL
(a) Unless otherwise provided in regulations to be prescribed by the Secretary concerned, a court-martial sentence of an enlisted member in pay grade above E-1, as approved by the convening authority, that includes--
(1) a dishonorable or bad-conduct discharge;
(2) confinement; or
(3) hard labor without confinement;
reduces that member to pay grade E1, effective on the date of that approval.
(b) If the sentence of a member who is reduced in pay grade under subsection (a) is set aside or disapproved, or, as finally approved does not include any punishment named in subsection (a)(1), (2), or (3), the rights and privileges of which he was deprived because of that reduction shall be restored to him and he is entitled to the pay and allowances to which he would have been entitled for the period the reduction was in effect, had he not been so reduced.

Notable examples of demotion in rank in the US Forces

References

  1. ^ http://www.stripes.com/news/army-general-accused-of-sex-assault-by-adviser-quietly-retired-with-demotion-1.306106
  2. ^ http://www.militarytimes.com/article/20140410/NEWS/304100051/Former-20th-Air-Force-commander-fired-after-Russia-trip-will-retire-1-star
  3. ^ http://www.cbsnews.com/news/u-s-army-general-demoted-for-mishandling-sexual-assault-report/
  4. ^ http://www.nytimes.com/1999/11/17/us/general-is-demoted-2-ranks-and-made-to-retire-in-sex-case.html
  5. ^ http://www.airforcetimes.com/news/2010/03/airforce_morrill_032010w/
  6. ^ http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/06/20/army-general-demoted-two-grades-in-sexual-misconduct-case/
  7. ^ http://articles.cnn.com/2008-05-09/us/admiral.affair_1_john-stufflebeem-federal-agency-affair?_s=PM:US
  8. ^ http://www.apnewsarchive.com/1995/Navy-Admiral-Retires-After-Being-Found-Guilty-of-Sexual-Harassment/id-b189b2096e656824db98a08e21797273

External links

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