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Ruby (color)

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Ruby (color)

Ruby
A natural ruby
    Color coordinates
Hex triplet #E0115F
sRGBB  (rgb) (224, 17, 95)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 92, 57, 12)
HSV       (h, s, v) (337°, 92%, 88[1]%)
Source Maerz and Paul[2]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Ruby is a color that is a representation of the color of the cut and polished ruby gemstone. The somewhat deeper color of the uncut, unpolished ruby crystal is called rubelite.

The first recorded use of ruby as a color name in English was in 1572.[3]

Variations of ruby

Rubine red

Rubine Red
    Color coordinates
Hex triplet #D10056
sRGBB  (rgb) (209, 0, 86)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 100, 59, 18)
HSV       (h, s, v) (335°, 100%, 82[4]%)
Source []
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Displayed at right is the Pantone color rubine red.

Ruber

Ruber
    Color coordinates
Hex triplet #CE4676
sRGBB  (rgb) (206, 70, 118)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 66, 43, 19)
HSV       (h, s, v) (339°, 66%, 81[5]%)
Source ISCC NBS
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

At right is displayed the color ruber.

The source of this color is: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of Ruber (color sample #254).

Medium ruby

Ruby (Crayola)
    Color coordinates
Hex triplet #AA4069
sRGBB  (rgb) (170, 64, 105)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 62, 38, 33)
HSV       (h, s, v) (337°, 62%, 67[6]%)
Source Crayola
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Medium ruby is the color called ruby in Crayola Gem Tones, a specialty set of Crayola crayons introduced in 1994.

Ruby red

Ruby Red
    Color coordinates
Hex triplet #9B111E
sRGBB  (rgb) (155, 17, 30)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 89, 81, 39)
HSV       (h, s, v) (354°, 89%, 61[7]%)
Source RAL
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Displayed at right is the color ruby red.

This is one of the colors in the RAL color matching system, a color system widely used in Europe. The RAL color list first originated in 1927, and it reached its present form in 1961.

Big dip o'ruby

Big Dip O'Ruby
    Color coordinates
Hex triplet #9C2542
sRGBB  (rgb) (156, 37, 66)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 76, 58, 39)
HSV       (h, s, v) (345°, 76%, 61[8]%)
Source Crayola
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Displayed at right is the color big dip o'ruby.

Big dip o'ruby is one of the colors in the special set of metallic Crayola crayons called Metallic FX, the colors of which were formulated by Crayola in 2001.

This is supposed to be a metallic color. However, there is no mechanism for displaying metallic colors on a flat computer screen.

Antique ruby

Antique Ruby
    Color coordinates
Hex triplet #841B2D
sRGBB  (rgb) (132, 27, 45)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 80, 66, 48)
HSV       (h, s, v) (350°, 80%, 52[9]%)
Source ISCC NBS
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

At right is displayed the color antique ruby.

The first recorded use of antique ruby as a color name in English was in 1926.[10]

The color antique ruby is a dark tone of ruby.

The source of this color is: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of Antique Ruby (color sample #13).

Deep ruby

Ruby (BS 381)
    Color coordinates
Hex triplet #843F5B
sRGBB  (rgb) (132, 63, 91)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 52, 31, 48)
HSV       (h, s, v) (336°, 52%, 52[11]%)
Source BS 381
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Displayed at right is deep tone of ruby that is called ruby in the British Standards 381 color list. This color is #542 on the 381 color list. The 381 color list is for colors used in identification, coding, and other special purposes. The British Standard color lists were first formulated in 1930 and reached their present form in 1955.

Ruby in nature

  • Infrared light in the portion of the spectrum where it is still visible to humans (out to approximately 1050 nanometers) appears ruby red. Starting at about 660 nm in the visible red, a monochromatic source such as an LED or laser begins to look very slightly purplish, gradually becoming more so as the wavelength increases. Below about 900 nm, the color is more purple than red, similar to some of the color samples on this page.

Ruby in culture

Computer programming

Film

Religion

Social hierarchy

See also

References

  1. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #EO115F (Ruby): Archived October 4, 2013 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ The color displayed in the color box above matches the color called ruby in the 1930 book by Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill; the color ruby is displayed on page 35, Plate 6, Color Sample G6.
  3. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 203; Color Sample of Ruby: Page 35 Plate 6 Color Sample G6
  4. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color # D10056 (Rubine Red): Archived October 4, 2013 at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #CE4676 (Ruber):
  6. ^ web.Forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to color #AA4069 (Medium Ruby): Archived October 4, 2013 at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color # 9B111E (Ruby Red): Archived October 4, 2013 at the Wayback Machine
  8. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #9C2542 (Big Dip O'Ruby): Archived October 4, 2013 at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #841B2D (Antique Ruby): Archived October 4, 2013 at the Wayback Machine
  10. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 189; Color Sample of Antique Ruby: Page 35 Plate 6 Color Sample L6
  11. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #843F5B (Deep Ruby): Archived October 4, 2013 at the Wayback Machine
  12. ^ Prophet, Elizabeth Clare and Prophet, Mark (as compiled by Annice Booth) The Masters and Their Retreats Corwin Springs, Montana:2003 Summit University Press--Padmasambhava Pages 258-263
  13. ^ Bonavia, David Peking New York:1978 Time-Life Books Great Cities of the World series Page 157

External links

  • All About Rubies:
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