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Sacramento Surge

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Sacramento Surge

Sacramento Surge
Sacramento Surge helmet
Sacramento Surge logo
Logo
Year founded 1991
Year retired 1992
City Sacramento, California
Team colors Aqua, Light Gold, Black, White[1]
                   
Franchise W-L-T record Regular season: 11–9
Postseason: 2–0
Championships

The Sacramento Surge was a professional American football team that played in the World League of American Football (WLAF) in 1991 and 1992. The team played its first season at Hughes Stadium in Sacramento, and the second season in Hornet Stadium on the Sacramento State University campus. It was owned by Managing General Partner Fred Anderson and the General Manager was Michael F. Keller. In charge of Special Projects was Jack Youngblood, who also partnered with Joe Starkey and Ronnie Lott on the Surge radio broadcasts KRAK.

The team was coached by former Buffalo Bills quarterback–head coach Kay Stephenson. Charlie Sumner was the defensive coordinator and Jim Haslett was a defensive assistant coach.

The Surge won the World Bowl in 1992, the only American team to do so. On this championship team was future professional wrestler Bill Goldberg.

After the WLAF ended its American presence at the end of the 1992 season, Surge owner Fred Anderson continued Sacramento's presence in professional football by acquiring a Canadian Football League expansion franchise. The new team was named the Sacramento Gold Miners; Stephenson and several Surge players were retained in the change, as were the team colors of aqua and yellow.

Contents

  • Season-by-season 1
  • 1991 season 2
    • Personnel 2.1
      • Staff 2.1.1
      • Roster 2.1.2
    • Schedule 2.2
  • 1992 season 3
    • Personnel 3.1
      • Staff 3.1.1
      • Roster 3.1.2
    • Schedule 3.2
  • External links 4
  • References 5

Season-by-season

Season League Regular season Postseason
Won Lost Ties Win % Finish Won Lost Win % Result
1991 WLAF 3 7 0 .300 3rd (North American West)
1992 WLAF 8 2 0 .800 1st (North American West) 2 0 1.000 World Bowl '92 champions
Total 11 9 0 .550 2 0 1.000

1991 season

1991 Sacramento Surge season
Head coach Kay Stephenson
General manager Mike Keller
Owner Fred Anderson
Home field Hughes Stadium
Results
Record 3–7
Division place 3rd
Playoff finish did not qualify
Timeline
Previous season Next season
1992

Personnel

Staff

[2]

Roster

Schedule

Week Date Opponent Results Game site Attendance
Final score Team record
1 Saturday, March 23 Raleigh–Durham Skyhawks W 9–3 1–0 Hughes Stadium 15,126
2 Saturday, March 30 at Birmingham Fire L 10–17 1–1 Legion Field 16,432
3 Sunday, April 7 at San Antonio Riders L 3–10 1–2 Alamo Stadium 6,772
4 Saturday, April 13 Frankfurt Galaxy W 16–10 2–2 Hughes Stadium 17,065
5 Monday, April 22 at New York/New Jersey Knights L 20–28 2–3 Giants Stadium 21,230
6 Saturday, April 27 Barcelona Dragons L 20–29 (OT) 2–4 Hughes Stadium 19,045
7 Saturday, May 4 Montreal Machine L 23–26 (OT) 2–5 Hughes Stadium 17,326
8 Saturday, May 11 at Orlando Thunder L 33–45 2–6 Florida Citrus Bowl 20,048
9 Saturday, May 18 London Monarchs L 21–45 2–7 Hughes Stadium 21,409
10 Saturday, May 25 at Frankfurt Galaxy W 24–13 3–7 Waldstadion 51,653

1992 season

1992 Sacramento Surge season
Head coach Kay Stephenson
General manager Mike Keller
Owner Fred Anderson
Home field Hornet Stadium
Results
Record 8–2
Division place 1st
Playoff finish World Bowl '92 champion
Timeline
Previous season Next season
1991

Personnel

Staff

[3]

Roster

[3]

Schedule

Week Date Kickoff Opponent Results Game site Attendance
Final score Team record
1 Saturday, March 21 Birmingham Fire W 20–6 1–0 Hornet Stadium 17,920
2 Sunday, March 29 at Ohio Glory W 17–6 2–0 Ohio Stadium 37,837[4]
3 Saturday, April 4 2:00 p.m.[5] Montreal Machine W 14–7 3–0 Hornet Stadium 21,024
4 Saturday, April 11 San Antonio Riders L 20–23 (OT) 3–1 Hornet Stadium 20,625[6]
5 Saturday, April 18 at Birmingham Fire L 14–28 3–2 Legion Field 20,794
6 Sunday, April 26 at London Monarchs W 31–26 4–2 Wembley Stadium 18,653
7 Sunday, May 3 at Montreal Machine W 35–21 5–2 Olympic Stadium 21,183
8 Saturday, May 9 Frankfurt Galaxy W 51–7 6–2 Hornet Stadium 22,720
9 Saturday, May 16 Ohio Glory W 21–7 7–2 Hornet Stadium 21,272
10 Saturday, May 23 at San Antonio Riders W 27–21 8–2 Bobcat Stadium 19,273
Postseason
Semifinal Sunday, May 31 Barcelona Dragons W 17–15 9–2 Hornet Stadium 23,640
World Bowl Sunday, June 6 8:10 p.m.[7] Orlando Thunder W 21–17 10–2 Olympic Stadium 43,789

External links

  • Sacramento Surge on FunWhileItLasted.net
  • 1991 Sacramento Surge stats on FootballDB.com
  • 1991 Sacramento Surge stats on FootballDB.com

References

  1. ^ "Team Colors – WLAF". SSUR.org. Retrieved January 16, 2010. 
  2. ^ 1991 Sacramento Surge Media Guide. 
  3. ^ a b 1992 Sacramento Surge Media Guide. 
  4. ^ "Around the league".  
  5. ^ "Machine at Surge".  
  6. ^ "Riders top Surge in overtime". The Sacramento Bee. April 12, 1992. Retrieved April 19, 2012. 
  7. ^ "QB Archer seeks 2nd NFL shot". Orlando Sentinel. June 6, 1992. Retrieved June 6, 2012. 
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