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Salim Group

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Salim Group

The Salim Group is Indonesia's biggest conglomerate with assets including Indofood Sukses Makmur, the world's largest instant noodle producer, and Bogasari, a large flour-milling operation.[1] The group was founded in October 1972 by Sudono Salim (16 July 1916 – 10 June 2012), also known as Liem Sioe Liong.

The Salim Group also owns major oil palm plantations (about 1,000 km²) and logging concessions.

In 1999, the group called off talks to sell a stake in Indofood to San Miguel Corporation, the main food and beverage conglomerate in the Philippines, because of control questions.

Salim Group has been involved in property development and the leisure industry for around 30 years. Its businesses include hotel and resort development, golf courses, and commercial real estate.[2]

Projects in West Bengal

The Salim Group is involved in a number of projects in West Bengal, an eastern state of India.

The Salim Group is involved in the construction of Kolkata West International City. Salim and Universal Success are investors in the project, Ciputra is the developer, and Singapore-based Surbana is the project manager.[3]

The proposal of the Salim Group for chemical hub and multi-product SEZ were cleared in principle by the board of approvals of the Union Commerce Ministry, Government of India, in October 2006.[4]

The chemical hub would be set up as a joint venture project of West Bengal Industrial Development Corporation Ltd and New Kolkata International Development. Indian Oil Corporation would be the anchor investor there.[5] The NKID comprises three companies including the Salim Group.[6] The chemical hub was earlier proposed to be set up at Nandigram but in reaction to the Nandigram violence was shifted to Nayachar.[7]

The proposal for a bridge across the Hooghly River from Raichak to Kukrahati, which will connect Haldia to Kolkata, has been hanging fire for many years. In earlier years, it was thought that the 2 km long cable bridge costing over Rs. 30 billion would be built with Malaysian support.[8] Thereafter, JICA came into the picture.[9] Subsequently, they were replaced by the Salim group.[10][11]

The construction of the Eastern Link Highway, linking Barasat with Raichak, which would be 100 km long and 100 m wide and spread over 2,500 acres (10 km²), is also on the anvil. The projects would be implemented by New Kolkata International Development Private Ltd, a special purpose company that has been promoted by the Salim Group, the Universal Success Group and Unitech.[12]

The government will acquire 5,000 acres (20 km2) for the Salim Group at Kukrahati to develop a township. The Kukrahati township would come up on low and saline land close to the banks of the Hooghly river.[13]

Buddhadeb Bhattacharya, chief minister, West Bengal, laid the foundation stone for eastern India's first two-wheeler project at Uluberia on 15 February 2006. A motorcycle factory would be set up by the Salim Group of Indonesia at a cumulative investment of $250 million. Spread over 65 acres (26 ha) of land provided by the State Government, the factory would be set up under the banner of Salim Group company Mahabharat Motors Manufacturing Pvt Ltd, and the two-wheelers would be sold under the brand name, Arjun. Speaking at both the functions, Benny Santoso, chief executive of the Salim Group, said the Indonesian business house with diverse business interests was keen to contribute and partake in the development of West Bengal.[14] Chuansung, a Chinese company, would be the technological collaborators.[15]

Member Companies

Former Companies

References

  1. ^ Business Times & Asian Wall Street Journal (June 1998)
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